Forum and Costume Controls

   FAQFAQ  SearchSearch  MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups  medals.php?sid=367b1b87c1469f081dea9d53dcbf4f94Medals   RegisterRegister   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in

       
REMINDER: Do not change your e-mail address yourself. Please read this first for why.

Rey's Boots-FINISHED! *PIC HEAVY*

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Rebel Legion Forum Index -> Costume and Prop Making -> Rebel Supporters -> Rebel Supporters Tutorials
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
CaptSolo77 (Brian)
Mos Eisley Base CO
Mos Eisley Base CO


Joined: 22 Feb 2011
Posts: 1220
Location: Tucson
Medals: 1 (View more...)
Troopers Helping Troopers (Amount: 1)

PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 4:00 am    Post subject: Rey's Boots-FINISHED! *PIC HEAVY* Reply with quote

From the top of her head to the tips of her toes: Having finished Rey’s goggles, I decided to take on those scavenger’s boots next. There’s nothing really ground-breaking in my approach; nothing too different than what others have done. However, maybe some of the observations or techniques may still be useful. I started with this pair of Dearfoam slippers:



They were on clearance for $15.00 a pair, so the price was right; but the biggest reason I chose them was the way the heel was shaped and how it met the foot. Everything was very similar to the original Po-Zu boot in its structure:



Definitely something to look for when looking for a boot to make into Rey’s boots. The biggest issue with them was the boot shaft is too short. On the original Po-Zu boot, the shaft is roughly as high as the foot is long:



This wasn’t too big a deal though, because I wanted to replace the boot shaft anyway. Nearly all these Dearfoam, Bearpaw, Ugg, and similar type boots have puffy, fleece-lined upper shafts. That doesn’t really work for Rey’s boots. So I removed the boot shaft and used the bottom edge of it as a pattern to create a new shaft. I referenced the shape of the Po-Zu boot to make the shape for the front part of the shaft. Then I cut the pattern from cardstock and attached it to the foot to make sure it was going to fit together right and that it was tall enough. Here’s a comparison shot:



Everything looks like it’s going to work out, so now it’s time to source materials and start the build. As always,

Stay tuned!!
_________________


"I may not be Han Solo, but I play him in real life."


Last edited by CaptSolo77 (Brian) on Fri Jun 24, 2016 2:53 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
CaptSolo77 (Brian)
Mos Eisley Base CO
Mos Eisley Base CO


Joined: 22 Feb 2011
Posts: 1220
Location: Tucson
Medals: 1 (View more...)
Troopers Helping Troopers (Amount: 1)

PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2016 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There was a can of Almond color Flex-Seal waiting for me in the mail yesterday, so that allows me to address a particular feature of Rey’s boots before moving on to the boot itself. That feature is the soles. If the current proposed Costume Standards for Rey go into effect (and it looks like they will) the boots will be required to have a “medium to light brown sole (slightly lighter than the main boot).” That means no matter how well constructed the rest of the boot is, how accurately the fabrics for the costume are chosen, how well the colors are chosen, if the soles of the boots are black, the costume will be denied and they will have to be fixed. We wouldn’t want that to happen, so we better go ahead and fix it now.

I sprayed the soles of the boots with two or three coats of the Flex-Seal. Flex-Seal is a spray-on, rubberized coating that you’ve probably seen advertised on TV. It bonds to rubber, so it will work fairly well to correct our black soles. It’s easier to do this now before moving on to the boot upper, so I just sprayed the soles without masking or anything:



I wasn’t entirely happy with the color I got. It was kind of peachy looking to my eye, so I pulled out another old trick. I found a regular acrylic paint in the color I wanted at the craft store and mixed it about 60% paint with 40% liquid latex. This makes a rubberized paint that should go over the Flex-Seal pretty well. I almost purchased a Plasti-Dip camouflage tan instead of the Flex-Seal. It may have been a better color straight out of the can, but I’m a sucker for late-night TV commercials. Here’s a comparison shot of the two colors next to each other:



Now I most likely would have done this anyway because I know the soles of the boots are tan, and I’m that picky about my costumes; but the fact that it has to be done in order to be approved seems a little ridiculous to me. That said, now it’s time to move on to the boot itself.

Another lesson well learned while making these is not to buy fabrics online! Colors and textures can be very deceiving; no way of knowing lighting conditions or how close the camera is to the fabric so texture may not be as pronounced as it seems. I struck out twice with fabric. According to the Po-Zu website, the screen-used boots are made from “British wool tweed.” My end solution was to hit the thrift shops. I found this Men’s wool tweed blazer and a pair of brown leather shoes:



Everything was half-off that day, so I got both for $16.00. These will be the base materials for the boots. Of course, the jacket is the wrong color, but being that it’s wool, it should accept dye with no troubles.

Off to draw a dye bath…
_________________


"I may not be Han Solo, but I play him in real life."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
CaptSolo77 (Brian)
Mos Eisley Base CO
Mos Eisley Base CO


Joined: 22 Feb 2011
Posts: 1220
Location: Tucson
Medals: 1 (View more...)
Troopers Helping Troopers (Amount: 1)

PostPosted: Wed May 11, 2016 11:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK, well the dye job was a success!! I used the standard RIT Dye Dark Brown on the tweed jacket and I’m fairly happy with the resulting color and texture of the fabric:



The subtle variations of color from the tweed were still visible under the dye, so it came out really nice. Now for the pattern. Since the Dearfoams bootie I’m building these from were so cheap, I went ahead and bought a second pair to cut apart in order to get an accurate pattern for cutting the fabric. Here are the component parts of the boot:



Once I had the pattern parts, I found it was quite difficult to find fabric on the jacket that was large enough to cut the pieces without having a seam in it; so if going the thrift-store jacket route for your fabric, take the pattern pieces with you when shopping for the jacket to make sure you will get the pieces you need. I was lucky here; it just barely squeaked through. Time to start the actual boot. I started by cutting the leather for the heel and sewing it to the fabric for the foot. Here’s a quick test fitting:



Both the leather heel and the fabric of the foot should overhang the sole of the boot by 1/8”-1/4”. My original plan was to glue the leather and fabric down right to the edge of the sole, and then cut off the excess right along the edge of the sole. I felt, though, like even doing that the boot would still look like a cheesy boot topper instead of an actual boot that was made to look like Rey’s boot; so I decided to actually press the excess fabric behind the edge of the rubber sole, between the sole and the boot. Gorilla Glue is making an excellent Super Glue gel formula that works really well for this. Starting with the leather heel, I pulled the fabric of the original boot foot away from the rubber sole and squeezed a little super glue into the crease:



Then I pressed the leather into the crease and held until the glue dried:



Before doing the same with the brown tweed fabric of the foot, I masked off the sole of the boot, pulled the tweed fabric back, and sprayed the foot area of the original slipper with spray mount:



Then I stretched the tweed over the foot and repeated the process of super gluing the fabric under the lip of the rubber sole:



You can also see here that I have already sewed the fabric for the back of the boot shaft onto the top edge of the leather heel patch, in preparation for the next step.

With that, we have a complete foot section! Repeat for the other boot, and we’re ready to move on to the boot shaft…


_________________


"I may not be Han Solo, but I play him in real life."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
CaptSolo77 (Brian)
Mos Eisley Base CO
Mos Eisley Base CO


Joined: 22 Feb 2011
Posts: 1220
Location: Tucson
Medals: 1 (View more...)
Troopers Helping Troopers (Amount: 1)

PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2016 5:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

With the foot part complete, we can now move on to the boot shafts. As previously stated, these types of boots all tend to have somewhat puffy, fleece-lined shafts that really look a little too full for Rey’s boots. To correct this, I used a very stiff, heavy felt I bought at Jo-Ann’s. Heavy interfacing would probably work as well. The front of the boot shaft overlaps the back, so we’ll have to put the back in first. Here is the basic shape of the back shaft:



Since the fabric covering for the boot shaft has already been sewn onto the leather heel, we’ll go ahead and install this piece into the foot of the boot. The foot is made of basically two parts; the original grey fabric outer shell which was covered with the brown tweed, and a lightweight foam type lining. Pull the lining inside the heel of the foot away from the outer shell and glue the felt shaft to the outer shell:



I used Household GOOP to do this. Others like E-6000. I think the GOOP sets-up a little faster and has more body, but either will work. Then, glue the foam lining back into place against the black felt:



Next, I wrapped the foot portion of the boot inside a plastic grocery bag and sprayed the outside of the black felt with spray mount:



After that, pull the fabric outer covering up over the black felt shaft, stretch and smooth out. Finally, pull the excess fabric up around the edges and glue or sew into place. Repeat for the other boot, and they’re nearly done…


_________________


"I may not be Han Solo, but I play him in real life."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Nomad Angie (Angie Rivera)
Active Legion Member


Joined: 13 May 2013
Posts: 505
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Medals: None

PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2016 9:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great! Now I have a reference to make. And not having to buy super expensive Po-Zu boots.
_________________
Dowager Queen Delegation Leader 2015-2017
Rebel Of The Year Nominee 2014
Royalty/Senatorial Legion Costume Judge 2016-2017
Base Membership Officer 2017
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
CaptSolo77 (Brian)
Mos Eisley Base CO
Mos Eisley Base CO


Joined: 22 Feb 2011
Posts: 1220
Location: Tucson
Medals: 1 (View more...)
Troopers Helping Troopers (Amount: 1)

PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2016 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nomad Angie wrote:
Great! Now I have a reference to make. And not having to buy super expensive Po-Zu boots.


You’ll need a front on it though…you can’t get by with just half a boot!! So let’s get this thing finished up!!

The process for the front is basically the same as the back. I sewed the fabric for the front boot shaft to the foot portion of the boot, like so:



Then I cut the shape for the front shaft from the heavyweight felt. Same process as the back shaft; I sprayed it with spray-mount:



And placed it behind the fabric I had previously sewn to the foot. Stretched the fabric over the felt and glued the excess fabric down around the edges toward the inside of the felt shaft. At this point, we basically have boots!!



All that’s left now is to sew the little leather tabs to the front part of the boot shaft. These will be used to lace the ties through. There are two on each side of the boot shaft:





The last little detail is the leather up the back of the boot shaft. The little strip that runs up the leather portion of the heel has a little loop at the top of it that’s also used for lacing. The strip that runs up the shaft from the heel on up is the only part I had to use vinyl to complete. The shoes didn’t have a continuous piece of leather long enough to make this strip. That strip also has a loop on the end of it:



Now just run the lacing through the loops and we have a reasonably good imitation of the PoZu boots. I used elastic cord left over from the goggles for the lacing in the back, as that seems like what comes on the PoZu boots, but I think leather lacing would look just as good:



I’m fairly pleased with how these turned out. All things considered, though, I’m not sure I wouldn’t just get the PoZu ones if I had it to do again. There’s probably somewhere between $60.00 and $80.00 in these; that plus the amount of time and effort required to make them might make it worth just going ahead and dropping the $200.00 for the PoZu boots. There is something to be said for making it yourself though, so who knows?


_________________


"I may not be Han Solo, but I play him in real life."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Rebel Legion Forum Index -> Costume and Prop Making -> Rebel Supporters -> Rebel Supporters Tutorials All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can post calendar events in this forum
The Rebel Legion is a worldwide Star Wars costuming organization comprised of and operated by Star Wars fans. While not sponsored by Lucasfilm Ltd., it is Lucasfilm's preferred volunteer Rebel costuming group. Star Wars, its characters, costumes, and all associated items are the intellectual property of Lucasfilm. © 2020 Lucasfilm Ltd. & ™ All rights reserved. Used under authorization.


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group