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Building the Hoth Rebel Trooper hat - better
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TKvanB (Kathy van Beuningen)
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 6:37 pm    Post subject: Building the Hoth Rebel Trooper hat - better Reply with quote

Back in about Feb. 2007, Phyllis asked me to try to build a Hoth Rebel Trooper hat for her future costume. She sent me a lot of screen shots and I came up with something.

Now 7 years later, we have a lot more reference pictures and we have also come across and actual hat that was used in the movies, and have pictures of that!

I am first going work on building all of the other parts of this costume before I make version #8, but Here I will share how I built mine and add some comments about how I will build the future version #8.
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TKvanB (Kathy van Beuningen)
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First the original hat build:

Feb 18, 2007:

TKvanB wrote:
Hoth Rebel Trooper prototype hat #2






Hoth Rebel Trooper prototype hat #1





Feb 25, 2007:

TKvanB wrote:




I have been taking some pictures on the progress of the hat prototype constructions. I have been working on three hats simultaneously.
The picture above is of the hood piece after I finished sewing the lines of stitching, but before I removed all of the pins.
I had maked out the paralel lines @ 1" apart with a fine point Mark-B-Gone pen.



Here are the three hood pieces. The top one is using kona cotton with low-loft 1/4" quilt batting. The center one is the utility fabric and even lower loft quilt batting. The bottom one is the utility fabric and standard fleece as the batting. (I ran out of quilt batting, so I decided I would give that a try)


TKvanB wrote:




These are the 2 back flaps after the 3 parts of each have been basted together. I usually run most pieces of anything I am building through the serger if I can. Aside from making the pieces easier to handle with out them falling apart, it also puts a real clean edge on everything and will ensure that everything will stay together for a very long time. I have not yet put one of these Hoth Rebel Trooper hats in the wash machine, but I am confident that they would make it just fine.

Anyway, I have opened out a small piece of bias trim on the back aide of one of the back flaps to demonstrate how to pin it in place. I have found that ALL of the applications of the bias trim needs to be pinned in place before sewing on to unsure that it lies evenly. That is a lot of work, but it's triple the work it you you have to remove it and re-apply it.
Towards the back of this picture is one of the outer hat constructions with the back flap in place.
THis picture is a little out of sequence if you were going to make the hat in steps, because I ran out of bias tape and had to go get more. I did as much as I could on the pieces I had.



TKvanB wrote:




......and now I have more bias tape.
I would advize anyone who plans to make this to match the tones of the materials you use.

In the cases of these particular hats:
The utility fabric Phyllis selected has a reddish tone to it. I decided to use the Wrights brand extra wide double fold "Taupe 033" because the current dye-lot available has a reddish tone. That was the best match to the fabric.
I looked at the "tan" but that had too much yellow in it for this particular fabric.

The kona cotton I chose it slightly more yellowish, so the Wrights brand extra wide double fold "kahki 097" of the current dye-lot was the best match ---- however there were two different dye-lots at the store! I can't stress enough to bring samples of the fabrics and trims you are working with to the store when you are trying to match.

I was able to find an extact match to the Wrights brand extra wide double fold "kahki 097" in "single fold" so I used that single fold for the lower trim on the front flap of the hat. That is the first piece that needs to be sewn on. (for the other two hats made out of the utility fabric, I was not able to find a matching single fold, so I fugured out how to make the double fold work for that application)

NOW...........going backwards in time.

This picture shows the visors and front flaps after the pieces were first fused (outer piece) to shirt tailor fusible interfacing. Then the peices were basted together, sregered, turned & pressed.

Here are the heavy-weight stabilizer pieces to be marked to trim & fit into the insides of the front flaps and visors.

After the stabilizer is inserted, baste in place along outer seam with the bulk of the seam on the under side of the visor & the back side of the front flap. Make sure to trim the stabilizer to allow a ~1/2" - 5/8" seam allowance where the pieces will join.


TKvanB wrote:



...and a little further back in time:

Here are the hat top and crown pieces and lining top and crown pieces first pinned together and then basted, sewn and topstitched together.



here are the front flaps and visors with the bias tape pinned in place.

I have decided that the best way to do this so far is to use thread that matches the hat fabric in the bobbin and thread that matches the color of the bias tape in the needle. Start by applying the double fold bias tape to the underside / backside of the pieces. Then topstitch close to the edge to seccure the front pieces of bias tape in place.


TKvanB wrote:



Here are the visor and front flap pinned together and the back flap pinned to the hat and basted in place.


TKvanB wrote:




Here is the visor and front flap construction sewn together, then pinned in place on the hat construction, then sewn in place.
At this point the hats build out of the utility faric began to become too thick for my sewing machine to sew through very easily.



After the front construction is sewn into place, I cut 5 pieces of 1" nylon belt material into about 3 3/4" pieces and melted the ends so they don't unravel. I pinned them in place along the back of the hat keeping an even 1" spacing between. Then I sewed them in place about 1/8" in from the basting stitching of the back flap.



This picture shows how the hood is to be pinned in place. There are a few steps skipped in picture form, including joining the front center of the hood, serging that small seam, trimming the hood to the desired shape and serging all of the edges. Then the hood needs to be pinned in place to the inside of the hat construction. This was extremely difficult for my macine to sew through all of the layers of the utility fabric. The kona cotton was easier, but also getting to be thick aty this point. Once the hood is sewn in place, fold under evenly and sew the loose ends of the belt loops in place.

Then (not pictured because Quincy took the camera to school this weekend) pin bias tape trim to the edged of the hood and sew in place, back side first, then top-stitch the outside. For this I purchased Wrights extra wide double fold bias tape "Oyster 028" .........which I did use on the kona cotton hat. HOWEVER, I think this looked almost too light with that fabric. (I am really picky about colors though) When I was going to use it on the utility fabric, the shade looked way too white and too different. So I decided to use the scraps of the kona cotton to make my own double fold bias trim. That took time to do, but it worked out great. It really matches well.

The hat pictured near the top of this picture has the lining pinned in place.
After the lining is pinned in place, hand-sew it in.



This is a picture of the back of Hoth Rebel Trooper prototype hat #2 (kona cotton)
that shows how the belt loops are sewn in place.

Is this more difficult to make than an Imperial Officer's hat?

YES.

The Imperial Officer's hat has 19 separate pieces, this has about 38.


Feb 26, 2007:

TKvanB wrote:




Here is a picture of the double fold bias-tape pinned to the inside of the hood edges. Once the trim is sewn on from the inside, fold it to the outside and pin it place, then topstitch it. I finished off the chin-strap tab ends with small pieces of dbl fold bias tape.

It appears in some shots of some of the hats on some of the characters who wear these, that there is a small connecting strap at the chin. That could always be added later once there is some more definite information on what it is / what color it should be / how it should be attached.





Here are all five of the Hoth Rebel Trooper hats that I have made.


These were the original hats.

I will now add what I will do differently.
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TKvanB (Kathy van Beuningen)
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Right after I finished these hats in Feb 2007, I started working on a doll version of the entire costume (including a doll-scale-sized hat) to help me figure out how to build the rest of the costume.

These are pictures from April 2, 2007:

TKvanB wrote:
There are still a few little things I want to add to the back pack when I locate the right little pieces and the gauntlettes aren't 100% finished yet, but here are a few pictures:















By that time, it was April 2007 and pretty much the last thing on my mind was "Hoth" so I must have moved on to the next (non-winter) project............
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TKvanB (Kathy van Beuningen)
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is my Hoth hat version #7 completed Jan 7 2014:




The differences with this hat are:

Fabric: It is a cotton fabric. This particular fabric I am pretty sure that I found in a collection of scraps that I inherited a few years ago. It is a slightly coarse cotton, but still fairly thin. It may even be muslin.

I attached the front flap first, then attached the visor. That must have been where I ran into problems with this when I originally started to build it (possibly in late 2007)

I hand-sewed the bias-tape onto the lower part of the hat, so there is no visible stitching.

I rounded the 'points' on the lower part of the hat and used one continuous piece of the extra-wide double-fold bias tape.

Here is my version #2 hat (left) and the new version #7 (right)

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TKvanB (Kathy van Beuningen)
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 7:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here are some pictures of an original screen-used hat:








The main differences from this original hat and what I have built previously:


The contrast binding, little loops on the back & the 'pouches' / ear flap thingies are all made of the same fabric.

OK, what will this mean? That in a version #8 hat, that I will have to make these pieces out of a separate fabric (and NOT use bias tape and nylon webbing straps and other material for the com-thingie flaps)

There are 3 small loops on the back of this hat, sewn onto the lower quilted portion of the hat (and not sewn into the seam)

Now, here is where I may use some artistic licence, because I swear that I have seen reference photos from the film where there were clearly 5 little loops on the hat and they DID look like they were sewn into the seam.
In the original hat, the bottom of these loops were not sewn down, rather they had small pieces of velcro sewn on the back. I would imagine that this would make it a LOT easier to be able to remove the goggles! I will do that on the next hat!

ALSO, and you can really see it in these pictures, those ear flaps ARE indeed sewn into the seam! They are NOT just hanging on the goggle-band. I have seen some other shots of the original hat where you can see that there is also a strip of velcro sewn onto the back slide of these flaps, so that you would easily be able to attach your goggles to the hat (and be able to easily remove the goggles.) SO, it the original hat, all of the tan flaps/loops have velcro on the backsides, so all of them can be lifted up to accommodate the goggles strap.

I have not yet built the ear flaps for my version #7 hat. At this point, I can not sew them into the seam. I will have to apply them in some fashion, however, I am thinking about sewing them right onto the hat.
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TKvanB (Kathy van Beuningen)
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is the link to the entire topic (May 2010) of the original hat (with LOADS more pictures) as found at the hotel in Norway:

http://www.rebellegion.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=23932&highlight=hat+norway

Here are some of the pictures that best describe these subtle nuances of the hat:


















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Schph Gochi (Phyllis Schulte)
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

if I ever get around to it....I need to make a few minor mods on my hat...

no piece is ever really done..
is it?

Laughing
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Commander Cody (Jason R.)
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 1:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the pictures, Kathy. The hat was the most difficult part of this costume for me Confused
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TKvanB (Kathy van Beuningen)
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 1:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now that I have the HTT costume done (for the time being), I will re-visit building the hat better.




This morning started with cutting out some 2" wide strips of fabric on the bias. I will make these into mostly double-fold strips and some single fold for the contrast trim on the hat. I also cut out some 3" wide strips that I will sew into tubes and turn into the small straps that are on the back of the hat. I also cut out some 4" x 4" squares that will become the small flaps over the ears. The one on the left of the hat will be reinforced to support the ear-com greeblie. This was all that I got done today.



This is the same fabric that I used for my HTT pants.
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TKvanB (Kathy van Beuningen)
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK. Why am I making bias strips like this instead of just buying a few packs of already-made bias tape?

As you can see from the reference photos of the screen-used hat (above) the fabric that was used for the 'contrast' pieces of the hat: the trim around the visor and front & upper back pieces, as well as the 2 ear flaps and the 3 little straps on the lower back (quilted part) are all made of the same material.

It would be nearly impossible to find both kinds of bias tape (extra-wide, double-fold and single fold) and additional fabric in the exact same color & weight.

That is why.

First of all, I am planning to build 3 hats at the same time, or at least that is how much fabric I cut out at this time. Plans could always change, and/or I could make mistakes. So I am planning to have some extra pieces ready to go just in case.

Here is what I did last night:



I cut out 12 ~4" x 4" squares of the contrast (khaki) fabric. These will be for the ear flaps on both sides of the hats. (see reference photos. There ARE indeed flaps on both sides)



Then I cut out (6) pieces of fusible interfacing. I am using the shirt-tailor style, since this is the heaviest fusible. I cut the interfacing to 2 3/4" x 3 1/4" pieces using my cutting mat, metal straight edge & rotary cutter. I rounded the 2 lower corners of all 6 pieces.

Next: How do you make extra-wide, double-fold bias tape?



First, I trimmed all of my (~ 2 1/2" wide rough-cut) bias-cut fabric strips to exactly 2" wide using my cutting mat, metal straight edge & rotary cutter. I pressed all strips exactly in half, so there would be a fold in each piece that would leave 1" of fabric on each side of the fold.



Then I folded and pressed one side of each strip into the center, to create a fold at 1/2".



Then I folded and pressed the other edge of each strip into the center to create a second fold at 1/2" from the other side toward the center.



Then I folded both sides back into the center and pressed the lengths.
I made about 12 yards (or more) of these. I am not going to connect the pieces, since I will be using short lengths of this material for the hats.


By now you are wondering why-the-heck am I going through all of this trouble to make these strips of fabric, right?
This is why:

Because you can press the bias strips into perfectly flat curves like this! You can't do this with fabric on the straight-graine. You will need to apply the contrast trim to the hat pieces on curves. Doing it this way, there will be no puckers.



This is where I am this morning.

Left-to-right: I have my pile of extra-wide, double-fold bias strips, about 1 yard of 'single-fold' (which is a tri-fold strip), sets of ear flap pairs, strips for small loops (hat back)

I fused the (6) interfacing pieces to (6) of the pieces that will become the LEFT ear-flaps. The interfacing will be on BOTH pieces (front & back) of this LEFT side because it will need to be load-bearing in order to support the ear-com greeblies (which are a heavy chunk of resin).



I made a sewing guide template for the un-interfaced ear-com flaps (RIGHT side of hat) I traced out the shape on the inside of the pieces of fabric, so that I will know exactly where to sew.
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TKvanB (Kathy van Beuningen)
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I spent the entire day & night yesterday working on the hats.
I took 2 breaks to go out and shovel snow at noon and around 6pm. We got about 6 more inches.

Aside from that, I was working on hats.


I spent most of the day & night working on the pieces for these hats. First I started with basting the seams for the ear-com flaps on my regular sewing machine.



Then I went over to my serger to make the pieces that will become the small loops on the back of the hat. How do you make a loop? First I ran a chain of serger thread slightly longer than the piece of fabric. I had pressed the fabric strip in half already. Then I placed the length of serger thread into the crease.....



...making sure that the end of the thread extended out from the end......



...then I started to serge the piece of fabric at the width I wanted it to be, making sure that I kept this width even all along the length of the strip of fabric.


Here is the end with the thread piece sticking out. After I sewed all of the strips, I put them aside while......



...I serged the seams of all of the ear-com flap pieces.....



Next I pressed all of the pieces. Here are the loop strips before I pressed them. They look like bacon right now. By pressing the serged seams, it slightly melts the thread in place, as well as flattening the fabric.



Here is one of the loop strips after it is pressed with the end of thread still sticking out.



Next I turned the strips so that they will be right-side-out. I started by pulling the end of the thread to start to gather the fabric to go inside itself......



Here the strip is pulled about halfway through....




....you can see the right side of the fabric coming out. Pull it all the way out.



Then press the seam evenly all the way along the strip on the back side first, then press the front side. Here are both sides after it is pressed.



Then I sewed around the seams of the pouches again, because I wanted the corners to be strong before I turned these right side out. I pressed the seams again, to melt the thread into the fabric before I turned them.....


Then I clipped the corners so they would lie flat when turned.........



Then I turned all of the ear-com flaps pieces. I used the round end of my large loop turner to push the corners all of the way out and so they would all have a nice evenly rounded shape. Then I pressed them all. I decided to add yet another layer of stabilizer to the interfaced flap pieces, to add even more support to these since they will be supporting the ear com greeblies.



Here are all of the kahki fabric (contrast) pieces. Left-to-right: double-fold bias strips, un-interfaced (right) ear flap pieces, interfaced (left) ear flap pieces with additional stabilizer to be inserted, loop strips, and along the bottom of this picture is the single fold bias strip. I wanted to do all of the kahki pieces first because I wanted to use kahki thread in my serger to make these.
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TKvanB (Kathy van Beuningen)
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


I decided I needed to re-do some of my original 2007 hat pattern pieces, especially the lower back piece. Here are the pattern pieces with my notes. Notice the kahki thread in my serger. It is a big pain-in-the-butt to change the thread.......


Detail of the hat band piece and the back top flap.



Detail of the hat crown, hat band and visor pattern pieces. A little while later I decided to re-do the front flap and visor pattern pieces before I cut the fabric.....


The new 2014 hat lower back piece.



I started to access the fabric that I had left from my costume build. I originally purchased 9 3/4 yards of this fabric for my costume. I had approximately 3 yards left including some odd pieces like this one that i had left over from cutting out the belt. I decided that I would cut out more bias strips (~2 1/2" wide rough cut) to make the double fold that will go around the lower back pieces of the hats. I could use pre-made bias tape for this, but I figured that if I do this, the fabric will match exactly.


Here are the pattern pieces lying on top of a triple fold length of my fabric. I realized that I would not have enough fabric to cut out the pieces for 3 hats. OH NO!! But after several hours of 'making it work' I was able to use all of the odd-ball left over pieces to cut out all of the pieces that I would need. I figured that I could use an alternate fabric for the hat linings if I was really desperate. I ended up only having to cut out one piece (a hat lining crown) out of another fabric.......whew!


Next, I started cutting out all of the batting pieces. I used this kind of batting for this.


Then I cut out the interfacing pieces......Here you can see the new pattern pieces I made for the front flap & visor.



The original pattern piece I made in 2007 did not account for the seam allowance. I used that piece as a template for the interfacing.


Then I started to fuse the interfacing pieces to the fabric pieces. Here is the new pattern piece for the front hat flap along with the fabric piece cut out and the interfacing piece cut out.



Here is a trick I discovered recently. Parchment paper. I can turn up the heat to the max on my iron when I use the parchment paper so that I can get a really flat and thorough melt when fusing! I am taking a lot of care preparing all of these pieces now, so that in the future, the finished hats will be extremely durable. Yes they will be able to be washed, dried and take a lot of punishment.


I figured I better take some pictures of what I was doing here......Here is one length (about a yard and a half) of the rough-cut bias strip. First I pressed it in half down the entire length. Then I folded it in quarters and lined it up perfectly on my cutting mat.



Then I aligned my metal straight edge on top of the fabric. Then I cut through all 8 layers of the fabric with my rotary cutter. You can see the cuttings from the previous strip on the right.....


Here is the perfectly cut strip ready to be pressed into double-fold bias tape. I made 3 lengths like this. Then I did all of the pressing..........



Here are all of the pieces layed out to build 3 Hoth Rebel Trooper hats. There are well over 100 pieces, probably around 150. Now I will change the thread in my serger to the cream cones (back of photo) .........................


The next thing that will need to happen is quilting the lower back pieces of the hats. First I drew out the sewing guide lines on 3 of the fabric pieces........


I sandwiched a piece of batting between 2 layers of fabric making sure that I have the outside of the fabric facing out on both layers. Then I spent a couple hours carefully pining the fabric in the center of each diamond.


Detail of the pinned pieces.




Then it was about 10PM and I was beat from doing all of this all day & night.
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Schph Gochi (Phyllis Schulte)
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you again for sharing all of this AWESOME information!!
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 2:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


I started sewing the quilting lines into the fabric. Best way to do this = chain the pieces through. Sew all of the parallel lines in one direction first. ALWAYS sew the fabric in the same direction.


Sewing the pieces in a chain, not only saves thread (and this uses a LOT of thread) but it also eliminates all of the thread ends that will get tangled together unless you cut them off right away.


Here I am sewing all of the lines in the other direction to form the diamond pattern.


Here is what all 3 pieces look like after I sewed all of the lines. At one point, I sewed a group of lines in the other direction and I got a little pulling/twisting in the fabric. I am not sure whether this will be a major problem and need to be re-done.


Closer shot of the quilted fabric pieces.


I took out all of the pins, then I basted the edged of the fabric in the sewing machine.



Then I ran the pieces through the serger to even the edges. I did this because I am going to wash these pieces to wash out the guide lines I drew in. I can hardly see them, but I know they are there. These pieces will still be trimmed down further as I fit them into the hats. I just want to make sure that I have more fabric there than I need. It's easier to cut off excess than to have to add.



Next I pinned the front flap and visor pieces together.....


....basted the seams.....while watching Olympic curling....Norway vs Great Britain tie-breaker.......


.....ran the seams through the serger.......



Pressed the stitching.......



....turned the pieces and pressed them again.......




Then I fitted the pieces to the stabilizer. I drew the shapes of the pieces onto the stabilizer, then cut. The pieces of stabilizer will need to fit inside the pieces perfectly.



I slid the stabilizer pieces inside each piece, then top-stitched the seam edge first. Then I basted the open edges of each piece so that the stabilizer would stay in place better while I fit the pieces onto the hats. And I am still watching curling.......



Here are the visor & front flap pieces with the edges stitches. Then I put together the hat back flap pieces together. Outside of fabric facing out with 1 piece of batting inside........



....basted these pieces together.......then I ran the edges through the serger......


Then I put together the hat band pieces. I have decided to wait to make the linings later, after I have the rest of each hat put together, so I can make the linings fit inside better.



Here are the 3 hat bands sewn together at the front & back seams.



I have all three of them pretty much at 12" (24" all around) At this point, I decided to work on one hat first to see how big this will turn out to be. I want one of these hats to fit me, so I am going to have to see how big of a hat this will make.



First I wanted to see if the pieces would fit on this size band. Right now, what I have done, these pieces will fit this size band. If I need to , I can cut down the back flap to fit if needed.



This is what the overlap of the pieces should look like on both sides. This is the correct amount of overlap.



Then I started to put the pieces together to form one hat. Here is one piece of hat crown, sitting on top of one piece of batting. I have the hat band sitting on top of that. I serged both the top and bottom edges of the hat band construction so it would all stay together while I work on the hat.



I ended up cutting about 1" out of the back seam of the band so that I could fit it to the hat crown. This is a point where the sizing can be adjusted. If you pin it to be smaller, the hat will become smaller -- but beware - once all of the pieces of this are put together, it will add a LOT of thickness to the inner dimension of the hat. I sewed the hat crown to the band........



Then I pinned the front and back flap pieces on again to check that they would still fit. I decided that the pieces were a correct fit, so onto the next step.....


I cut & pressed into shape pieces of the contrast double fold bias strips to fit the shapes of the front flap.......



....back flap.....




....and visor. By pre-pressing these pieces into the correct shape, it will minimize potential puckers & creases.



I pinned the bias pieces onto the back sides of the hat pieces and sewed them on.



Then I folded the bias strips over and sewed them onto the front. These look slightly uneven. Pressing will correct a lot of this, but I think for the next group, I will sew them front-to-back.




I used my tailor's ham to press the visor & front flap to get more of a curve to the shape of these pieces.



Here is the front flap on the ham after I pressed it.



Then I pinned and basted the back flap on the hat, lining up the center of the flap with the back seam of the hat band. I then pinned the front flap in place.



Here it is lined up in place. I sewed it on and moved to the visor......but then I realized that I would need to sew on the front flap contrast piece that is between the visor and the front flap. I had to take it apart and sew on that piece of contrast. SO, for the next hat, I will sew that piece on FIRST, before I sew on the double fold. I will take more pictures of that when I do it.
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TKvanB (Kathy van Beuningen)
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Joined: 04 Sep 2002
Posts: 460
Location: Chicago
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Day #4 of the hat build continues.......


After I had initially sewed the visor in place, I realized that there would be no way to neatly add the horizontal piece of single fold bias fabric onto the front flap. SO, I took the visor and front flap off the hat and loosed the ends of the double fold trim so that I could sew that one piece in place. Than I re-attached the front flap in place and fit the visor back in. I had to hand-baste the visor in place, because I could not get the construction under my sewing machine needle and be able to keep it straight. After several hours of monkeying around with it, I got it to the correct form.


Here is the side view where the pieces join.




Detailed shot of that area. Yes, it is still a mess, but that will be resolved.



Detail shot of the other side.......


What it looks like from the inside......


I wanted to see how the goggle fit on the hat. Side view....




Front view with goggles on the hat. I decided that I was satisfied with how this looks, so I moved on to the next part.




....meanwhile....earlier in the day I machine washed and dried the 3 quilted lower back portions of the hat constructions. All of my pencil marks washed out and the fabric got a nice texture to it. I then cut 3 lengths of the fabric tube that I made and pinned them onto the back of the hat. I KNOW that this is not how the screen used hats were done. I am pretty sure those pieces were added later as an after-thought. What I am making is the "better" hat. I know that the goggles straps placement will be an issue. I am resolving that right now by sewing them into the seams, as well as the ear-com flaps. Here they are all pinned in place. I will baste them at the seam line and the.......




.....fit the quilted lower back portion of the hat in place. For this particular hat size, I had exactly enough fabric to go around the hat. I didn't take pictures of the next bits of sewing because it was really intense. I will try to do so on the next hat, because this can be very tricky to do and will likely involve doing it over several times to get it to look right.




Here is the hat turned right side out, but the lower portion is pinned in place. I am trying to decide whether it is even all around......





....what it looks like turned back, but still pinned in place.




....some time later, I got this thing to come together evenly and I sewed it in place. Then I sewed it all in place some more to make sure that I have several rows of thread around the seam-line. This thing is not going to come apart without extreme effort. Then I started to pin the double-fold bias strip onto the outside of the hat, over-lapping at the front seam...


Here is the bias strip pinned in place. I sewed it on. Right now I am debating whether or not to hand-sew it in place. Hand-sewing is much slower, but I can get it to lie much nicer than sewing it with the machine.



.....and that's where I left off last night.
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