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The Saber-smith's Thread
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Schph Gochi (Phyllis Schulte)
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2014 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Plan on it then....
and I might bring either leather working or casting/mold/sculpt stuff...

I think some people really do like to see "how we do that".

Wink
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Tymae Yarmoo ()
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2014 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about a few more!!...........

This one I have been planning for a while. I really wanted an Old Republic looking saber. I cannibalized the other Old Republic saber I made and used the parts elsewhere. I still have a few parts including the cyan LED. Here is my newest incarnation of an Old Republic saber. And yes...it is a sound saber.






Here is another I got around to finishing. I have worked on this one off and on for a while. The story is, I wanted to make a yellow blade. This is actually not an easy thing to do since there is no yellow LED available. You need to run a red and green LED in parallel to make yellow (look up primary colors of light if you do not believe me).

I was able to make the electronic part of it successfully. I then began working on a suitable body for it, something worthy of the hard work. I was not really happy with what I had originally made so that hilt will be used in my saber building demo at the Joliet Library event. This picture is of what I finally did come up with...



It is Qui Gon inspired but with the black and silver reversed. I hand made the shroud you see on it....



...then I painted it.

I think this saber is really cool looking and the yellow has a nice home in it. It is a stunt saber since I can not figure out how to wire it up as a sound...but maybe some day.

Enjoy the pictures. I will have my display set up at Joliet Library and I have a little demo build presentation I am ready to do. I think it will be a crowd pleaser and add something else to the event.
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Tymae Yarmoo ()
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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2014 2:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

All right, here we go again......

I am working on another build but this one is totally different....it is not for me. A friend of mine looked at my work and asked me to make a saber for him.

Since all of my builds have been for me and revolved around a trial and error style of crafting, this saber is a very different project. It is the first saber build for me that has been completely planned out in advance. The saber was designed and all of the parts ordered at the same time. When the box arrived today, I got an idea. I am going to document this build from start to finish. My goal here is that no work will get done without a picture posted.

Here is what I have so far.....

THE DESIGN:
He and I sat in my living room and designed this to his specifications.



THE PARTS ARRIVE:


SHAKING EVERYTHING OUT:


THE ELECRONICS:
Battery, LED module, switch, sound card, speaker, resistors to balance the circuit, and some quick connects to wire it up.


THE BLADE AND BLADE PLUG:


THE CHASSIS PARTS:
These parts will be used to create a chassis to support the battery, speaker and sound card.


THE DRY FIT OF THE HILT PARTS:
Nothing is wired up or finished. This is just to get a feel for what the final product will look.


A CLOSE UP OF THE BLADE HOLDER DETAIL:


There you have it, the conception of a saber. Make some popcorn, pull up a chair, and get comfy....this is going to be a journey of a thousand miles, and this has been the first step.

Stay tuned.
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hartss ()
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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2014 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i think you should definatley do a talk or demo on your craft at joliet, your work is beutiful

you should at least have a table to show it all off
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Tymae Yarmoo ()
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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2014 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hartss wrote:
i think you should definatley do a talk or demo on your craft at joliet, your work is beutiful

you should at least have a table to show it all off


That is already in the works. I believe I am scheduled to do a demo in between the saber battles. I have a nice display made and a simple saber I can build at the event for the public.
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hartss ()
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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2014 4:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

great, i definately want to see that
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Tymae Yarmoo ()
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PostPosted: Mon May 05, 2014 11:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did a little work on this build for a friend. We are trying to figure out a paint issue with the grip so the hilt work is at a stand still for a few days. I did work on the chassis.

The chassis will hold the sound card and battery. TCSS makes acrylic chassis discs that are designed to hold the various components and fit inside their hilt pieces perfectly. These chassis pieces are worth every penny. Here is the construction of the chassis that will support the battery and sound card....

4-40 all-thread rod.


These are the "spacers" that TCSS sells. They are great when you need a 1/2" spacer since it is tough to cut tubing that small. Again, worth every penny.


Here it is. Simple, right? Just slip the chassis discs and the spacers on the rods. Then sandwich them with some little nuts. The battery fits in the round hole and the sound card will slide in the rectangle hole on top and piggy-back.


This is the speaker mount piece. It is just a plastic cylinder that the speaker snaps into. The silver disc is sized so that it will lock in between two TCSS MHS (modular hilt system) body pieces. I used 4-40 screws to mount the mount on the disc so the speaker will stay put in the pommel. In some builds it is possible to make the chassis and speaker mount one continuous piece or "sled", but the ribbed piece that the battery will be inside has a smaller diameter and the holes on the silver disc will not line up right. I have made plenty of 2 piece chassis before so this is no problem at all.




I also put together the pommel. There is an insert that must go in the pommel. Depending on if it is a sound build or stunt, there are different inserts (solid, vented, etc.) The insert is held in by a ring clip and special pliers are needed to get the clip locked in place. The clips are sometimes called the "duck clip" because ducking is what you will need to do if it pops off the pliers (there are other names but they are not suited for this family friendly forum).






I will see my friend tomorrow and get this paint issue straightened out. More work will come in a few days. Once the paint issue is figured out, we will do a little painting.

After that, some drilling and tapping for the blade screw. Get ready, I am gonna bust out my cute little drill press very soon.

Stay tuned.
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Tymae Yarmoo ()
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PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2014 2:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

More work today.....

I met with my buddy yesterday and we got the paint issue resolved. However, today was not a good day to paint so I worked on the electronics.

Now, most of this involves soldering electronics and it is not my intention to write a tutorial on soldering. Soldering is a skill all to itself and is something that must be learned and honed before attempting saber-smithing. You need to know how the iron works, how to play the heat, how the solder behaves and understand how the "wicking" action works. There are plenty of resources out there to teach you how to solder but you really need to try it yourself to get the hang of it. I bought some 26 gauge wire and just soldered joints over and over until I got it right before trying to make a saber.

With that said, we will focus on the actual wiring steps and what is connected to what. Here we go...



THE TOOLS:




WIRING THE SPEAKER:I wired up the speaker first because that is easy.









Once soldered, the speaker just pops into the mount.






WIRING THE RECHARGE PORT: I like to wire up the recharge port and use that to charge the battery. It serves as a test of the recharge port before assembling.

Here is my low tech drawing of the recharge port wiring. This drawing has a permanent home in my construction manual. It is easy to mess up the wiring so I look at t every time.



All soldered up, just needs the shrink wrap.






THE SWITCH: I wired up the switch next using the same method. I like to put the switch and recharge port in the mount to help hold them still while soldering.



Next I charged the battery using my battery charger. The label on the charger is my doing. The charger can charge different voltages so I always double check. Better safe than sorry.




THE WHIP: Next I made the LED whip. This will connect the LED module to the sound card, which all components are run through. The switch is illuminated as well so this whip will power both LED's. For this, we need three quick connects and 2 resistors, one to protect the main LED and one to protect the LED in the switch itself. What we are making is a parallel circuit.








THE SOUND CARD: Now for the fun and hard part. The sound card is the most delicate and most expensive part. Much care is needed for wiring it. I like to use quick connects on the card so it can be disassembled if needed. These quick connects are called JST connecters. TCSS used to sell a pre-wired card, but not any more. The pre-wired ones had the female ends of the connectors on it and the male ends were always on the components (like the LED). I have always been in the habit of soldering the boards in the same way for consistency.

Here is my drawing for the card.




For reference of how small these things are. That is an AA battery.






I did not take pictures of each solder step as much attention is needed when wiring the card. You can see that some of the sockets have two wires in them which is a very tight fit. I also labeled all of the connectors. It is easy to trace them out when the saber is apart. But as you assemble, it is easy to get lost in your own hilt and not know which connector is which.


For reference on how small the connections are.


CONFIGURING THE SOUND CARD: The sound card has a micro SD card in it which contains the sound fonts. The font properties are adjustable (such as the volume). An adapter is needed to plug it into your computer but once plugged in, you can adjust the variables directly by accessing the file.



The battery takes a while to charge the first time so it is still charging. Once it is charged up, I will connect the components and test the circuit. It is much better to find problems before the saber is assembled, rather that after.

If all works well, the rest is metalwork and painting.

We are getting there, stay tuned.
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Tymae Yarmoo ()
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PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 1:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lots of work got done today….

First, I tested the circuit I built yesterday….



…and it did not work. I had to do some trouble shooting. This is why I test before I assemble. I had to bust out the Fluke multi-meter…


…and found that the culprit was a bad JST connector....



….which caused a bad connection on the black wire and provided no power to either of the LED’s. I cut off the JST connector and spliced in another. Now we are in business…



Here is a video so you can hear the hum...
http://s1358.photobucket.com/user/tcvcj3106/media/003_zpsa05c16b9.mp4.html


Next, I did my drilling and tapping for the blade screw. For this, I needed my cute little drill press….



A lot of care is needed for this step. Aside from soldering the sound board, this is the most unnerving part because you only get one shot at doing it right. There is a tip I will pass on in doing this. The LED module of the TCSS parts locks in place between the emitter and body. The lip on the LED module is thicker than needed. The gap between the parts in having the LED in place, verse not having it in there, is almost too small to see with your eye. But when you have holes that are supposed to line up, and they don’t, you notice that.

I screw in the emitter and make a mark where I want the hole to be in line with other parts (in this case, the switch hole), then I put the LED module in place and screw the emitter in again. The mark will be off so I make a second mark that lines up with the switch hole. I then use a punch to make a dimple in between the two marks. Once drilled, the hole will not initially line up as desired. This is where my trick comes in.

I take the LED module apart and, using emery cloth, I plain down the underside of the LED housing. Sand, then test fit, then sand some more. By gradually sanding down the underside of the housing, you can get the screw hole to “sneak up” on the spot you want it to line up to. Look at the pictures and you will see what I mean.
















Does not line up







With the LED in, it still does not line up, but in it favors the other side.



So we will sand it down.



And test. Nope, still not right. More sanding.





Just right….



Now I file the bur out of the inside of the emitter so it does not gouge the plastic blade.





Now time for a bath. Lots of oil is needed for drilling and tapping . I do not want oil to be inside the saber, not just because of the electronics, but because I do not oil to seep out on a costume either. A tub of water and some dish soap does the trick.



Now, let’s do some painting…..


The goal here is to paint the ribbed piece to look kind of like leather. It will not look exactly like leather, but we will use a satin brown paint to give that impression.

First, I will use degreaser to strip all of the oil from the metal. This helps the primer stick.



Then primer. Etching primer is best for aluminum. It will actually etch the metal a little bit so the primer has something to bite on.



Then paint and clear coat. I like satin clear coat, it is just a preference.




I did a test piece to see if the results are good. They are.


Next, I taped off the ends. One the female end, I wanted to not paint the entire end. I wanted to replicate the look of the little flat spot of the final rib on the other end so the piece looks symmetrical.



For the mail end, nothing protects thread as good as Teflon pipe tape.


I then inserted a paper towel tube to use as a handle and hanger.



Primed…



Painted…



Clear coated…



…Just kidding. The last picture is the same as the above one. But it is clear coat, so how would you ever know? Ha ha. Ok I am done joking around. Here is the result after drying….



It may look odd the way that I taped off the female end for the paint job, but trust me, when it is completely assembled, you will see why I did it that way.

Well, that is it for today, (give me a break, that was a lot),but we are getting close to the finish line. All we have left is to do a little dressing work to the blade so it is fuller and brighter (another trick I will pass on) and then the final assembly.

I am going to try to finish this over the weekend, but I cannot promise that. Keep looking at this thread, we will finish this soon. When you see a glowing bladed saber, that is the end.

Stay tuned!!
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Tymae Yarmoo ()
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PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Time for some blade work!!!!

Here is my tutorial on how to make a blade even better. This is something anyone with a TCSS blade can do.



TCSS show blades consist of a clear polycarbonate tube, an opaque inner tube, and the tip. The problem with the blades, as is, is that they do not really light all the way to the tip. They get kind of thin and dim right under the tip. To correct this, we will put a rolled up piece of cellophane inside to give the light something to bounce around on and fill the blade completely.

Cellophane can be found at any craft store or even Target and Wall-mart. Look for, or ask for, clear wrapping paper. It is cheap and you can do an entire arsenal of saber blades with one roll.



Now, I did not take a picture of the blade lit up without the cellophane inside. The camera does not show the difference very well. But trust me, this make a huge difference.

To start, I teased out the inner white tube and trimmed it down about ¼”. The reason for this is to give some space for the hot glue we will use later.











Next, we need a flat surface to work on… AND IT MUST BE CLEAN. I cannot emphasize this enough. CLEAN CLEAN CLEAN. Anything like crumbs or hair that is on the surface will get picked up by the cellophane and be inside the blade, which looks terrible. The first time I did this, I ended up with a blade full of dog hair and believe me, as funny as that sounds, it was not fun to have to rework the blade. CLEAN!!

Set the blade on the table and roll out the cellophane so it is the length of the blade. It is not real important that the ends are neat, they will get trimmed later.


Cut your piece loner than the blade. Then using a smooth pencil, wrap the cellophane into a tight roll. Some people recommend using a dowel rod but this has always worked well for me.



Once rolled up, slip the pencil out and slide the roll into the blade.



Once the cellophane is seated in the tube completely, trim the end. I like to trim twice, once on each end. This means trim once nice and straight, leaving it long, then tighten up the roll with my pinky finger and carefully remove it from the blade. Then I reinsert it with the nicely trimmed end first. For the second cut, you will want to pull the cellophane out a bit and trim it so it sits below flush.





Next, I like to test the blade. I stuck the blade into one of my sabers to make sure that I did not get any crumbs or hair inside.



Looks good.

Next is hot gluing. The reason for the below flush cutting of the cellophane and the white tube is to give us a place to put a nice bead of hot glue. This will hold all of the inner pieces in place.







All done. It does not need to be a work of art since it will be socketed into the emitter and not seen, but do not get too sloppy. If you get some on the outside of the blade, wait until it cools and just rub it off.

The reason I specify that this should be done to TCSS blades is that Ultra Saber blades already have this cellophane inside. If you look at an Ultra Saber blade when out of the hilt, you can see the hot glue bead just inside the blade.

When I do this, I use 36” cellophane so I have 36” rolled up inside. Some people say you need more but I find 36” to be good. I tried more one time and it did not make the blade any brighter, at least not to my eyes.

Patience is key with this. It is aggravating. I chase my kids away when I do this because there are four letter words uttered in anger every time I do this and I do not want them to hear.

All that is left now for this build is final assembling. I will have that done tonight or tomorrow.

We are in the home stretch…..stay tuned.
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Tymae Yarmoo ()
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PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2014 2:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

FINAL STEPS:

I needed to do two things before I started putting this bad boy together. One was to coat the sound card connections so they do not accidently short out.

The other was to file a groove in the chassis. You will see why in a minute.

THE SOUND CARD TREATMENT:

The connections on the card are very small and the wires are very close together. I am always afraid that they will get bunched together and short out. To prevent this, I like to use a product called liquid tape. This stuff dries and creates a nice non-conductive layer on the wires. This stuff must be used in a ventilated area. It smells real bad, like, brain cell killing bad.









The next preparation step is to file a groove in the chassis discs. All of the components are “in front” of the sound card. The speaker, however, it behind the sound card, in the pommel. The wires to the speaker, therefore, need a path to get there. There is no channel in the disc for them to pass through so the easiest thing to do is file a groove for them to seat in.



This stuff is great for a quick cleaning.







ASSEMBLING:

We need to put a little bit of lubrication on the threads. TCSS sell little tubes of grease called “super lube” for this purpose and it works great. A little dab and rub it in the threads.







Now we can start putting the guts in. This is easier said than done because you start to run out of room very quickly. Saber-smiths lovingly refer to this technique as “cram-fu.”



If these were not labeled it would be impossible to tell which was which.













Now, I need to gently work the wires into the hilt. Believe it or not, they will fit, you just need to massage them until they find a home.






One last look inside. Cram-fu, baby. Cram-fu.








DRUMROLL PLEASE……..

I present, The Morgan.



The saber has a few features worth noting. You will notice the gold thumb screw in the neck. This is there to hold the blade in place. Most sabers have a set screw which sits flush and requires an Allen wrench to remove the blade. The thumb screw makes it easier to get the blade in and out and adds some style.

Another thing you will notice is the little gold knob under the switch. That is called a “kill plug.” The sound card sucks juice out of the battery even when the saber is turned off. The draining is slow but there. The “kill plug” is inserted into the recharge port to prevent the slow battery drain when not in use, and removed for use. It is not 100% needed but is I nice little feature and again, adds some style while on the shelf.

The saber also has an illuminated switch with a green ring and a cyan main blade LED.







A video for your pleasure...

http://s1358.photobucket.com/user/tcvcj3106/media/047_zpsb81f4402.mp4.html

Well, there you have it. The saber is named after the owner, my friend, Morgan. He designed it, I built it.

I hope you enjoyed this journey. I hope it was fun and informative. I hope someone might have learned a thing or two, I sure did. As with every saber I have built, I learned a lot and enjoyed every minute of it.

Enjoy a few closing pictures….





Ready to go to its rightful owner. I am actually going to miss this saber, but it will have a good home.



Thanks for reading along.

Let me know what you think.
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Tymae Yarmoo ()
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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2014 11:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Although there have been no replies.....this thread has been looked at 318 times since I finished this build. I am tickled to see it is getting looked at. I hope someone out there is getting something out of my documented build.

Perhaps it has become a tutorial of some sort.

I wonder if this thread has been linked to by someone on this or another forum.

Maybe I will never know.
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hyperguyver2 (James Kelly)
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PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2014 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe you could answer this. Is there a way to make the ultrasabers blades brighter?
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PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2014 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hyperguyver2 wrote:
Maybe you could answer this. Is there a way to make the ultrasabers blades brighter?

There are a lot of things that contribute to how bright the blade is.

One is the color. Some colors just appear brighter than others because of our eyes. Purple, for instance, is a difficult color to get brighter just because of its position on the light spectrum and the way our eyes see the color. I do not understand why this is, it is just what I have read over and over on different forums about lightsabers.

Another factor is the wattage of the LED. Most of what I have built is with either US standard colors or TCSS standard colors. I have one saber I built that is with the US color Bane's Heart. It is hands down the brightest saber I have built. The LED modules they use for these special colors are a more powerful type and therefore, come out much brighter.

The type of blade is also a factor. The US "Mid-grade" blades are just a clear tube with cellophane rolled up inside to defuse the light. US also sells the "Ultra Edge" blades which are supposed to make the blade brighter but I have read tend to fade the color a little bit. I do not own any US Ultra Edge blades so I do not know how they are constructed. If they do not have any cellophane rolled up inside, you can always get clear wrapping paper and insert it like I did in this build. If it already has it inside, I do not know what else can be done. I have read that lightly sanding the blades to rough them up will help make then brighter, but I have never tried it. This will create more defusing of the light and therefore, should make the blade look brighter.

There are other blades out there like the TCSS "show blades" that have an opaque inner tube that makes the blade brighter. I like this type of blade because to me, they create the movie look of a white core with an aura of color, but with some colors, like purples, they will rob from the color saturation.

Heavy-grade Blades or Battle Blades have a thicker wall and tend to give the blade more of a "light in a tube" effect. If you have one of these blades and you do not intend to duel with the saber, switching to a standard walled blade might help.

One thing to keep in mind is the limitations of the technology. For example, in the day light, the blade will never really look bright. At the Discovery World event, I noticed while standing in the main hallway, that the saber blades really did not look like anything other than a tube because of the sunlight drowning the color out. The blades also tend to look much brighter in pictures than up close. This is just the nature of the beast.

I hope this helps. To further help you, I would need to know which color you have and which type of blade. Something else might come to mind if I have all of the information on what exactly you have to work with.
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hyperguyver2 (James Kelly)
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PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2014 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow thats alot to digest. I have a US mid-grade blade, the color LED I use is green so its still bright but I just want it brighter
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