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Jedi Tunic Tutorials (plus tabards/obi), by SithariRog
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stardancer1914 ()
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 5:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You wash your fabric before cutting because it will shrink most likely. To prevent the fraying you could put fabric glue or a No-fray glue on the edges that are raw and may fray before washing. Just be sure to let the glue dry for 24 hours before you wash or it will come off. Or you could just use a zig-zag stitch or a double stitch on the raw edges. Double stitch is where you stitch close to the edge and then stitch again 1/8" from the first line of stitching. I found a lighter weight wool-suiting fabric for my robes that has the look and feel of wool but is less in cost. You might try looking at those.
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SithariRog (Roger Allen)
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks David!

I’m glad you found the tutorial and hope everything turns out well for you. I will tell you that I have all of the pictures needed for an upcoming update to this tutorial. It’ll be more user friendly when I get the update finished.

delston wrote:
Hi SithariRog,

I've found your tutorials, and decided this past weekend that I'm going to go for it as a fun project to work on. Thanks for these really helpful posts. I'm currently finished with the patterns, and cut out all the test fabric last night. Eager to start stitching the OT. I've got a few questions if you can lend me your comments:

1. What sort of stitch are you using to in the shoulders, down the sides, and the sleeves? After spending a few minutes examining the seams in my dress shirts this morning (something I've never paid much attention to!) it appears they use a fell flat seam. I see you mentioned learning how to do french seams, but wasn't sure if that's what you used for the construction of the main panels.

Well…I’ve use a stain liner in all of my Jedi costumes (so far). In each case, cut out two pieces for each required pattern piece, one for the “outside” fabric and one for the liner. I sewed each liner piece to the outer piece with a zigzag stitch. Then I treated each piece as one piece of fabric.

Sewing the costume together, I used a basic stitch and with the middle or average setting on my sewing machine. I would sew under the arm twice and around the collar area for added strength. THEN…I would “finish” the seam with a…well…you could use a zigzag…my machine has a number of “anti-fray” type of stitches…fancy “serger-type” stitch to prevent fraying. I would then cut off the excess fabric off (since I don’t have a serger).

Hope this made sense. If not, let me know.


2. When you say wash the fabrics prior to stitching, do you simply put in the uncut fabric roll in the wash, or after cutting? I'm only asking out of concern it'll come out badly frayed.

Yeah, like Dianne said…wash everything BEFORE you cut any fabric. Cottons (especially) will shrink. I do run a zigzag stitch on the ends of the material pieces so they don’t fray too much in the washer.

And this is true of any fabric you’re about to use. You should treat, uncut, by what ever means you intend to use to clean it (once the costume is made). If you’re going to dryclean your wool robe, for example, then take the fabric to the drycleaners first. THEN make your robe.


3. I'm a little unclear what is going on in the pattern steps 6, 7 & 8. I think it appears to be creating a collar, but can't be sure though. Could you perhaps provide a close up pic of the collar on your OT?

Yes, this is the step that took me forever to figure out. Pattern instructions are not written in any “language” that the common person understands, lol. The update to this tutorial will help a LOT. I’ll try in words, then…do some close up pics to help out too, but the pics will come later.

Basically, you’ve got three pieces to cut for the collar: two pieces of fabric and one piece of interfacing (I use thick/stiff fusible, meaning it’s got a sticky side that sticks to the fabric once you iron it. Just be sure to iron from the “non-sticky” side or you’ll make a mess with your iron).

First, I sew the interfacing to one of the collar pieces, with a 0.5” seam allowance. Then I trim off the excess. Then…I pin and sew this piece, right sides together. I will then iron the excess towards the interfacing.

Second, I sew the other fabric piece to the interfaced piece, again, right sides together. Iron the seam allowance excess towards the interfacing.

Third, fold this “second” fabric piece over and pin to the “inside” of the outer tunic. You’ll fold this piece down about a half inch, then fold towards the inside and pin in place. Then you have two choices:
1. You can use a hidden hem stick to hand sew the inside of the collar. This ensures that you don’t an ugly stitch on the outside.
2. If you pin the inside “past” (or over) the first stitch of the collar, then you can “stitch in the ditch”. This is where you finish the collar with your machine, but you’re sewing in the outside collar-to-outer tunic seam…effectively hiding this stitch. It’s not truly hidden, but it looks pretty good.

I tend to go with method #1.

If that didn’t make sense, let me know. I’ve got pics that I can post.


On a side note...Can you comment on the Jedi robe material you selected? I see some wool selections online that are nice, but pretty expensive ($16+/yd). I like the thickness of wool, but don't want to overdo it if there's a particular type I should be looking for.

I was intent on making an OWK (ROTS) costume (which I did…but applied with it as a Generic Jedi). So, I was in search of a similar wool that was used in the film. This was VERY difficult to find. There were 5 of us on CrazyOldWizards site that were looking for this. One dude found the perfect wool and posted where to get it. I got 10 of the last 30 yards that were available. I’ve not seen it since…though I keep looking. This was about two years ago.

So, if you’re not going for a face character, then any appropriate wool will do. Many people will use a “thicker” linen, which has a good drape and flow. The main thing is to see the fabric before you buy. ALWAYS order swatches (of a decent size) to see it before you order. I will tell you that I get a lot of fabrics from:
http://www.fashionfabricsclub.com/
http://www.denverfabrics.com/
and
http://www.onlinefabricstore.net/Home.aspx

JoAnn’s and Handcock are okay, but are usually a bit more expensive than the online places.

And…the swatch I order is 1/8 yard that is the whole width. These swatches usually cost a $1-$4…ish, so not bad to see a good sized piece for texture and drape. If I order the fabric, I’ll use this swatch piece as a test piece for cleaning (washing or dry cleaning).


Thanks in advance for any help you can provide. I also should say thanks for opening my eyes to a craft I never knew i had interest in. (sewing, tailoring, etc.) I watched my mom quilt and sew for decades, but never really gave it a go until now.

David

PS, I'm sure I will have more questions eventually...but I've learned a ton already.


Don’t worry about questions….keep them coming! I live to serve my fellow Jedi and padawans Wink
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delston (David Elston)



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 3:23 am    Post subject: OT Sleeves Reply with quote

SithariRog, I'm not clear on how the sleeves are attached to the main tunic front/back during step 3. In your photo with all the panels laid out on the floor before you started stitching, you have the flared out end of the sleeves laying away from the tunic body and the small end laying such that it looks like you intend to join the sleeve's skinny end to the tunic body.

Is this correct? Some of pattern pics you posted make me think the flared end should be attached to the body. I'm only doing my mock up but figured I'd ask anyway.
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sze-wan ()



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 9:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This tutorial is based on Simplicity 4450.
In Simplicity 4450, the flared end is attached to the body.

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SithariRog (Roger Allen)
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 1:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

sze-wan is correct!

This is the one (...hmmm, only one???) mistake in the tutorial. The flared end should be against the body of the tunic. I will correct this in my update of this tutorial (soon).

I will say that one fellow made his outer tunic just like it is pictured and it turned our good. The OT is "full" enough that the arm pit area was not constricted. And this just goes to show you that, outside of doing a face character, the GJCS are open to variabilty Wink
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delston (David Elston)



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SithariRog wrote:

One dude found the perfect wool and posted where to get it.


As I'm rapidly finding that there are many types of wool, I'm hoping someone can give me a term to search for that was like the "perfect" wool you found. Or even some wool types to rule out. For instance I assume I should not be looking for a suiting wool as it would likely be too thin. As for medium or heavy, I'm guessing medium is a better choice here. Any particular name for the wool being referring to?

On a side note, I'm also considering the Hopsack Linen that KrisAntilles used in her build. It's going to probably come down to economics for me, so options are a good thing.
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EEK! I think you need a PhD in wool to understand the various types, textures, weaves and weights...as there are a LOT!!!

I would call my OWK robe a medium weight wool. It's "fuzzy". Yeah, I know that's not a technical term. But you're right, suiting wool would probably be too thin....or too tight a weave. I've seen some gabardines that are nice. Almost anything with a "twill" word in the name seems good too, if memory serves.

The main thing is....see before you buy! Get a swatch (as I mentioned earlier)...like...a big swatch.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I've ordered a bunch of swatches of different fabrics for the various tunics and robe. Hopefully they'll come labeled because there are a lot alike, even some with the same name, just a slightly different online number. Thanks for the suggestions on websites as well.

I'm curious, after reading KrisAntilles' post and this one, I'm a bit unsure what fabric to choose for the inner tunic. Currently I'm considering a jersey knit like she did, though it seems what you (SithariRog) did was a bit different.

Also, I've made my mock OT over this weekend, and have really enjoyed the process. Never knew I liked this stuff, but my wife has been calling me "Suzie" lol. I'm not sure how best to finish the seams or whether to leave them as-is.

If anyone has some recommendations on inner tunic fabric, or seam finishing I'm all ears.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can use whatever you want for your inner tunic. It doesn't have to be jersey knit. That was just a personal preference for me and the way I made my inner tunic. My inner tunic is sewn shut at both sides, so I literally have to put it on over my head like a long sleeve t-shirt and I wanted a nice snug fit, so I needed the stretchy jersey knit (and originally I was going to replicate Obi-Wan's ROTS outfit, and his undertunic looks like some kind of jersey knit), so that's the main reason I went with jersey.

I think most people have their inner tunics open front and they cross over the front and close just like their outer tunics. Why I made mine sewn shut and put it on like a t-shirt? I have no idea....it just seemed to work for me. lol. But I know that "t-shirt style" doesn't work for everyone and does require a fabric with some stretch to it, like the jersey. If you make your inner tunic close in the front like your outer tunic, you can use whatever; jersey, cotton, linen, etc.... I believe crinkle cotton was used for some of the movie inner tunics.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I hate knit...with a passion. Being a very stretchy fabric AND that the raw edges curl, I find sewing knits an extreme challenge...and avoid it at all costs.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Finishing seams, you mean to keep them from fraying? You can use an overlock stitch if your sewing machine has one, or if not, a zigzag stitch will work too.

http://youtu.be/XpSQRPvBw9Y
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SithariRog wrote:
I hate knit...with a passion. Being a very stretchy fabric AND that the raw edges curl, I find sewing knits an extreme challenge...and avoid it at all costs.


Yes, jersey knit is definitely more challenging to sew than non stretch fabrics.
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 08, 2014 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Rog, I'm going through this tutorial with practice fabric like you recommended at the beginning of the tutorial, and I'm confused about the skirt part. I made a pendulum on the floor and did the first step, and now I have done the OT back and fronts as well. Do I need to make another pendulum on the floor and make another skirt pattern or do I need to just use the skirt I already made with the first step?
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