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Jedi Tunic Tutorials (plus tabards/obi), by EeanLedgor
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Verda Alor'ad (brandt cothren)



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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2015 2:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

first, awesome tutorial. i started my own cosutme attempts before finding your tutorial so i thought id share some of my findings as well.

to start with, i also used flat sheets for my test and practice material. im a pretty big guy and i got 1 tunic out of a twin flat sheet. this material i feel will actually work pretty well for an innertunic on my actual costume. it is a bit to sheer for the outer tunic imo.

also, i used a t shirt as my initial pattern and then modified that as a pattern as i tried different things. also read elsewhere that a t shirt is a good starting point for an inner tunic as you know its going to fit fairly well. i also modified my inner tunic pattern to have a higher collar than the 5840 pattern shows because from photos ive seen, i like the collar to fit closer to the neck so that it would cover a t shirt.

now for the question phase. you said in your OP that you arrived at a measurement of 26 inches for the back. where did you measure from and how well did it fit? my t shirt pattern seemed pretty good for the inner tunic but it was tight across the shoulders when i put the tucks in, although i didnt do the tucks right.

next question is about the shoulder tucks. one tutorial i saw said to only back sew the sleeve under the should for 4-5 inches on each side of the seam and let the rest hang. is this how you did it? i had actually tapered my tuck around the whole sleeve with the largest amount of tuck at the top and no tuck at the bottom.

next, was the skirt sewn solid all the way around, except for the front split of course? and how important is the skirt to the overall look/ have you done a few without it? just worried that for my size it may not look great

and lastly, i know you said you used the cotton gauze for both inner and outer but have you found better material since then? seems that the outer should be a thicker, more course material, especially if you go by the premise that some jedi wanted itchy material that was distracting so they could focus more on concentration to overcome it. kind of an always reminder to focus.

thanks again for making a great tutorial and helping so many with RL and 501 approved costuming ideas.
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EeanLedgor ()
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2015 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Verda Alor'ad wrote:


Thanks for the kind words. Here's some thoughts on your quesitons...

now for the question phase. you said in your OP that you arrived at a measurement of 26 inches for the back. where did you measure from and how well did it fit? my t shirt pattern seemed pretty good for the inner tunic but it was tight across the shoulders when i put the tucks in, although i didnt do the tucks right.

I measured the back panel of a dress shirt (buttoned and collared), from side seam to side seam. This was 24 inches. I knew there would be a 5/8" (1 cm) seam allowance on each side, and...for good measure (i.e., for the heck of it) I added a little more. 24" + 5/8" + 5/8" + a little more = 26".

To add to this thought...the front panels are half of the back panel...26"/2 = 13".

This gave the overall circumference of the upper portion of the outer tunic. This ended up being a little "roomy", which Jedi OTs should be.


next question is about the shoulder tucks. one tutorial i saw said to only back sew the sleeve under the should for 4-5 inches on each side of the seam and let the rest hang. is this how you did it? i had actually tapered my tuck around the whole sleeve with the largest amount of tuck at the top and no tuck at the bottom.

For my shoulder tucks, I do, indeed, sew the tucks in place (with a machine) and sew 5" on either side of the shoulder seam, for a total stitch length of 10". The rest of the OT, around the arms hangs freely, and this looks good.

Can you do as you suggest, and taper the tuck stitch to the seam? Of course. The only thing I might say about this is...there doesn't appear to be a visible stitch under the armpit area in the Jedi seen in the prequel films (namely OWK, Anakin, Windu). While this doesn't really matter to me (and while this shouldn't matter to a face character in being approved for an organized costume club), there are some uber nitpicky people that such a stitch would bug the crap out of (and some of these folks might spew some...aggressive opinionations...in your direction). It's a matter of debate in which I'll not participate.


next, was the skirt sewn solid all the way around, except for the front split of course? and how important is the skirt to the overall look/ have you done a few without it? just worried that for my size it may not look great

I'm not sure I fully understand this question, but here's some thoughts...

One of the major problems seen in commercially available patterns (Simplicity 4450, 5840, etc.) and with costumes made by commercial vendors (even the better ones) is that the portion of the OT below the obi is too form fitting. In the films, it is clear that the portion of the OT below the obi (called "the skirt") has a greater circumference at the bottom hem than at the waist...in other words, it looks as though the portion of the OT below the obi is more like a skirt, than a shirt tail. The Jedi costumes seen in the prequel films (again naming OWK, Anakin, Windu) as a "flair" and a "drape" that is more full than you will find in the commercially available patterns and costumes.

I have never made a Jedi OT without a skirt. I have made Jedi for females, and males and for people between 5'6" to 6'4" and weighing between 140 pounds to 300 pounds. If anyone asks me, I'm going to recommend a "skirt". I will only add that, depending on the size and the specific design, it might be prudent to sew a mock up to get the look right. Some might benefit from a skirt that is more gathered than others.

I will further add that since the seam between the upper portion of the OT and the skirt will be hidden under the obi, you may:
1. make this combination OT top + skirt as explained in this tutorial.
2. make the OT top more like a shirt top that would be tucked into the pants, then make a separate skirt component to be fixed around the middle (under the obi).
3. OR you may cut one pattern piece that includes the OT "top" and skirt so that there is no seam to worry about hidding under the obi. THIS is my current method of fabrication...and I will be updating my tutorial with this option...in the (hopefully) near future.

Bottom line: make it look like it does in the films. How you accomplish this is of less importance.


and lastly, i know you said you used the cotton gauze for both inner and outer but have you found better material since then? seems that the outer should be a thicker, more course material, especially if you go by the premise that some jedi wanted itchy material that was distracting so they could focus more on concentration to overcome it. kind of an always reminder to focus.

hahaha...I have to chuckle a bit, as I've never heard that "itchy" explanation to help the Jedi focus on the Force. I'm not discounting it...I just never heard of that. Regardless...

Again the main goal is to make a Jedi costume that is similar in look to those seen in the films. For OWK and Anakin, the material used is similar to a "crinkle" cotton gauze. Mace Windu's costume is more of a textures wool (and I'm only guessing here).

Using a cotton gauze seems to be fairly popular. Most of the gauzes I've seen are rather thin, and (in my opinion) require some kind of liner to help give these thinner fabrics that rich/thick look that's seen in the films. I prefer to use a polysatin liner when I'm using a gauze material. I'm about to make a new Jedi for myself that uses a textured wool...and while this fabric looks good without a liner, I will use one anyway, because I like the feel of polysatin.

What material is "best"? Well, that's a matter of opinion. And an opinion is influenced by the desired look/design and the funds available for making a costume.

I would suggest you have a look at this thread where I give my opinion on Jedi fabrics and colors:

http://www.forum.rebellegion.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=49614





thanks again for making a great tutorial and helping so many with RL and 501 approved costuming ideas.

Your kind words are appreciated. And yes, I'm rather happy that my efforts have helped so many. It's fun to have someone come up to me at a con and ask if I'm "that guy to makes the tutorials". I've met many people who have become friends from all over the world...and for that I'm eternally grateful for the hobby of costuming.

PS Look for a new tutorial on a screen accurate Emperor Palpatine ROTJ (tunic and robe) on the SLD forums after the holidays Wink

.
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Grim Juniper ()



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PostPosted: Wed Dec 02, 2015 5:08 pm    Post subject: Combing the OT & Skirt as one piece Reply with quote

I attempted to combine & cut the OT top & skirt as one piece as this sounded great, less sewing! My problem was that the skirt was at my knees. I think I maybe should have compensated for not having to combine the two pieces due to no longer having a seam allowance on either piece? I ended up taking about 5 inches off the skirt portion, to get it 4 inches above my knee. Does that sound ok?

when I look at pictures of Obi-Wan the skirt is well above the knee, and the tabbards are a few inches longer than the skirt. I am about 6'0' & thought I could follow your exact measurements.

Quote:
3. OR you may cut one pattern piece that includes the OT "top" and skirt so that there is no seam to worry about hidding under the obi. THIS is my current method of fabrication...and I will be updating my tutorial with this option...in the (hopefully) near future.
[/quote]
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EeanLedgor ()
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 02, 2015 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hiya Grim...


The result of what you did likely ended up okay. There's no problem with having the outer tunic too long...as you can always cut it shorter (which you did). But here are some thoughts...

When combining the upper and lower panels of the Outer Tunic to make a single panel pattern piece, I measure from the shoulder (at the neck) to where the middle of the obi will be worn. THEN, I put the top side of the skirt pattern at that level (which will overlap by quite a bit on the upper panel of the OT). Then I trace the "new" pattern or directly on the fabric for a one-piece panel. This ends up giving me two front panels and one back panel.

To give some numbers...for me, this distance to measure is roughly 18". The upper front panel is 23" long. I draw a line parallel to the bottom on this pattern piece at 18", then lay the top side of the skirt at this line. Hope that made sense.

When I update the tutorials, I'll show exactly how I do this. I will also show how to modify the pattern to fit...husky Jedi too.
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serephent ()



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PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2016 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EeanLedgor wrote:
The key is to read through the tutorial carefully and do the research for your particular jedi costume BEFORE you buy material and start cutting.


I realized this a little after the fact! Still finishing the one I'm working on and modifying it as I go. It's for my hubby and he has a robe, so my not quite long enough sleeve should be ok..

Question on the lining. I know it's optional, but in looking at yours it doesn't look, umm, puffy? Sorry, just learning to sew and still figuring out the proper terms for stuff. When I line something I sew the two pieces together right to right and then turn it back out again, but this always leaves a bit of, I don't know what to call it but puff, more than just the two pieces together would create if not flipped. I am wondering if this is how you did it on yours? And did you find you needed to top stitch?

Thanks for putting this together Smile


Last edited by serephent () on Sat Nov 19, 2016 9:10 pm; edited 1 time in total
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EeanLedgor ()
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2016 5:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello serephent!

If I understand correctly, I see how this puffiness is happening. By sewing liner pieces to the pattern pieces (right sides together), flipping them THEN assembling the costume, your seam allowances are six layers thick whereas the main body of the costume is two layers thick. I never did it this way. In my early days of making Jedi, I sewed liner pieces to pattern pieces, wrong sides together (no flipping), and treated them as once piece. Yes, the inside seams were ugly, but not visible, so I didn't care.

Nowadays, I sew the complete outer tunic (but not the collar), and sew a complete liner, then sew liner to outer tunic (right sides together), flip, THEN add the collar. This way all seams are hidden. I hem the bottom edge of the tunic lining separately from the outer tunic...so the liner isn't attached at the bottom. This prevents bunching. This method gives a more professional look.

Hope this helps.
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serephent ()



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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2016 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you! That makes sense. What about with tabards? I don't really see a way to do that other than right/right and flipping?
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2016 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

serephent wrote:
Thank you! That makes sense. What about with tabards? I don't really see a way to do that other than right/right and flipping?


Oh....definitely, the tabards and obi are "bagged out", as they say. Sew right sides together, turn inside out, stitch the end. I make sure the end I stitch will be hidden.
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serephent ()



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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 1:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A few people have mentioned that the obi shouldn't be able to fold down, that it needs to be stiffer and have suggested interfacing for this. Is there any standard?
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armageddon42388 ()



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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the great tutorial! I was able to make tunics for my wife and myself with no prior sewing experience whatsoever! They're not the best looking tunics, but I'm satisfied with them and am eager to try again!

I have a question on the seam connecting the skirt to the upper parts of the tunic. The length of the top piece of the tunic front skirt should match the length of the bottom piece of the tunic front. So for example, in your pictures on page 1, that length is 13".

But when you sew them together, because of the seam allowance, the diagonal/slanted/outer part of the skirt is no longer flush with the upper tunic piece. I can try to add some pictures if that doesn't make sense...

It's probably not a big deal since they're close enough, and I just did my best when sewing down the sides of the tunic, but I was wondering if there was a better way to handle that part and make the best tunic I can!
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 4:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

serephent wrote:
A few people have mentioned that the obi shouldn't be able to fold down, that it needs to be stiffer and have suggested interfacing for this. Is there any standard?


It needs to look like the ones in the movies. I stiffen the back of mone with canvas and then, if I want the scruntchy look for the crinkle fabric, I make the front wider than the back and use that to make it look wight. There is a tutorial on here somewhere on how to do it.
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armageddon42388 ()



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PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2016 11:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Added pictures to better explain what I'm trying to say: http://imgur.com/a/ttT9s
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2016 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

armageddon42388 wrote:
Added pictures to better explain what I'm trying to say: http://imgur.com/a/ttT9s


There's two ways to handle this.

One is "easing" the seams. This is where you have uneven seams. You simply "make them fit". If the discrepancy isn't too great, then you can pin them together at regular intervals and make the two pieces fit so that there is really no gathering effect. This seems to be somewhat common when connecting sleeves to shirt/jacket costumes/clothes. There have been time when, in order to get a non gathered look, I've placed pins every half inch apart. A lot of pinning!

The other thing to consider is that this portion is under the obi, so who really cares, since it won't be seen. On the other hand, for future costumes, just alter your pattern to make them line up.

Two...these days, I have the two pattern pieces, the top tunic and the skirt portion. But instead of cutting two separate pieces, I'm now adjusting these costume, as needed, and cutting one piece for the tunic/skirt portion. This eliminates the mid belly seam. I hope this makes sense. If no, let me know. I find this method is easier.

Also, a while ago I started making the liners separate, then attaching them. This eliminates any raw edges on the costume...very professional looking. I hope to update the tutorial at some point, to incorporate the subtle changes I've made to it over the years.
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armageddon42388 ()



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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 8:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks! I look forward to your updated tutorial!

I think I will just modify the pattern slightly so they line up.

When you say one piece for the tunic/skirt portion, do you mean you combined the front tunic and front skirt into one piece (well... two if you count the left and right sides), and the back tunic and back skirt into one piece?

Isn't the reason for having the skirt as a separate piece from the tunic is so that is flows better?
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, the skirt portion (the part below the obi) is more full for a better drape/flow of the outer tunic.

I'll try to explain with words...if they're inadequate, then I can do a drawing...just let me know.


Basically, I got tired of trying to gage that upper tunic to skirt seam that needs to be hidden under the obi. Here's a recent "mod" I do to get around that.

I take the two pattern pieces (the front OT top and the front OT skirt) and lay them on top of each other, overlapping at the "belt" line so that the seam would fall about where the obi should be. I move the pieces around so that the upper OT pattern piece length is correct for the costume. Below this part is where the flare starts from the skirt. These two pieces, lined up properly, are placed over the fabric and one piece is cut for the entire front of the OT. This is done for the back...and the repeated for the liner pieces (if your'e doing a liner).

You'll end up with one pattern piece that is the same as though you had done this as this tutorial originally shows (where two pieces are sewn together at the belt line)...but now without that pesky seam that needs to fall under the obi.

In the end, you'll have three pieces for the OT, two fronts and one back, rather than a total of 6 pieces as originally depicted in this tutorial.

Again....if pictures are needed, let em know. Otherwise, I'll show this in the update. I can't promise when the update will happen. Hopefully before Celebration VIII.
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