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Endor Rebel weathering methods

 
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Stroker ()
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2017 3:30 am    Post subject: Endor Rebel weathering methods Reply with quote

I've weathered a ton of armour however I don't know what the best methods are for my ERT. Any tips on the boots,gaiters,and vest?
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jthatcher (Jim Thatcher)
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2017 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A lot of people recommend natural weathering. Stomp around in the woods for a while and get them nice and dirty!
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OddViking ()
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 05, 2017 3:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I love how the costumes of Star Wars have good weathering, and the Endor Trooper are good and dirty. I see a lot of Endor troopers on here with clean vests and gloves, and I think it is missing that lived-in look that the costumes have. I just finished my ERT, so here are a few techniques to weather without using dirt:

Weathering tutorial

First off, look at these movie costumes. The gaiters are really dirty, the gloves are filthy, and the vests are heavily grimed. This is what the Endor Rebel Trooper costume should be aspiring to:



Think about HOW it would get dirty

When you are weathering, don't just throw on paint in splotches all over, think about how an item would get dirty from use. Edges that get touched would have some grime. Glove palms get dirty, but also the cuffs from pulling them on and off with the other dirty glove. Gaiters splash in mud, so would be most dirty at the bottom, and splatter should come from below (so lay them flat and fling paint from a low angle to mimic that splatter). The slash pockets in the vest would be dirty on the top edge, and behind the pocket from dirty hands and objects being put in. And don't forget the ring of dirt around the shirt, and cuffs of the long sleeve shirt. If you are using the watered down acrylic, paint it on and then wipe it off so it stays in the cracks like real dirt does. Look at old converse shoes, how the white rubber gets dirty in all of the texture. Look at dirty work clothes, and see how things like a mechanic's coveralls get oiler at the sleeve cuffs, and around the pockets. Take some 150 grit sandpaper to some edges, and on your elbows and knees, to fuzz up those parts that get more wear on your own clothes.

Method 1 - acrylic paint



I use three colors of Liquitex Basics acrylic paint: Ivory black (sparingly), Raw Umber (majority), and Burnt Umber (sparingly). I put all three in a pan or tupperware near each other, and add some water. Using a thumb-width brush, mix them loosely with each other, but don't fully mix any of it. Daub into the water first, daub into some dark brown, and daub back into water and paint on the edges of the gaiters. Keep splashing back into water often (add more water into your pan) a few times as you go, the first layer should be fairly transparent. You can see some marks that look like faint circles with darker edges, and this is what that first layer should look like. Get some patches of redder staining, some darker, and keep adding splashes. Spatter by shaking the brush or hitting the brush against your finger. You can do your gloves at the same time by wearing them through this whole process. It will look too dark at first from the water, but let it dry and see what it really looks like. The key is to do it a bit, let it dry a few hours, do it some more, and let it dry. If you put too much, wash it with some water right a way and rub it with a rag, and it will thin out. The third pass you use the paint without much water to get the really dark mud, and this should mostly be on the edges and at the bottom around the heels. Same with boots. As you go, paint it on, and then wipe it off periodically on things like the rubber, so it stays in the cracks like real dirt.

Method 2 - Design Master spray paint

I asked a friend who does movie props what to use, and he said the Design Master spray paint (the same you use for the cammo, find it at craft stores like Michael's) has this color called "Glossy Wood Tone" and it is a great light brown. You can layer it on lightly, and this is the fastest way to add grime to the vest and long-sleeved shirt, the soft cap, and other parts.



You can see the before and after. It looks darker when you first spray it, but ten minutes later it will lighten a bit. See how the collar looks like one that has been worn and sweat in for a few days in the woods.

Tea Dying:

I tried some tea dying, but it didn't have much effect. You brew a pot with about 6-8 tea bags, and after it cools "paint" and spatter on, or even submerge some cloths in it. Very faint, but it does give some irregular staining here and there.

Distress Ink

I also tried some "Distress Ink" that you can find at craft stores and Michaels, but again, it was fairly faint and hard to cover large areas. You pat it on, and then mist with water. It is on my rig, but not as easy or fast as the Design Master spray. It comes in lots of colors and variety packs, but start with faint ones first.

More Examples:



The Bandolier strap and greeblies booth had acrylic aging done. The strap was watered down quite a bit. The greeblies were put on full strength acrylic, and then wiped off right away, so it stayed dirty in the cracks. The wrist comm is a great example. I could only find white elastic, so I used the design master spray (the brown Glossy Wood Tone and some Moss Green from the cammo) in a few coats to get to beige. Then once it was attached, I hit the edges with more wet acrylic. The comm was painted and wiped with dark brown acrylic in all of the cracks, and some smudges where a gloved finger would touch it.



The gloves in the movies are really dirty, so hit these a few times, and wear them when aging other parts. For the Hard pack, dry brush the edges and high points (dry brush is where you dip in full strength acrylic, and then wipe it dry on a paper towel, and then lightly brush with the side of the brush on the fabric so it only really sticks to the high points). On the right is my vest, that is mostly done with the spray on the edges and behind the pockets. I finished it up with some very watered down acrylic spatters and stains here and there.

Good luck! Here is how my whole costume came out:

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Schph Gochi (Phyllis Schulte)
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 05, 2017 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jthatcher wrote:
A lot of people recommend natural weathering. Stomp around in the woods for a while and get them nice and dirty!


agree


I will be honest in that I am not big on weathering...
some people take it too far...and imho....less is more....
where I do weather some things...other things I just leave alone.

Just using stuff is my preference on weathering things that are fabric or leather...


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OddViking ()
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Using it is a good way to weather it, but... there is no way you are going to wear it as much as the character is supposed to have worn it, so it will never look as weathered as it should. Unless it is raining and muddy, rolling in the dirt once will probably not have enough effect, especially on shoes and gloves.
I see a LOT of Endor Rebel Troopers with these bright yellow gloves, and spotless beige vests. You can see in the reference pics, those troopers had those parts weathered and dirty in the movies so they looked like veteran commandos that had done this many times before.
Obi-wan's tunic is worn and patched, and a costume of him should be the same. Luke's Tatooine buckle was once painted black, but is pitted and chipped halfway to bare metal, and that makes it look like he has worn it on his sandy farm for years. To me, that is what made Star Wars feel lived-in and more real than other movies. The Rebel Fleet Troopers had their clothes dry-cleaned, but the people in remote places felt like they lived there. Death Star Stormtroopers are brilliant white. Tatooine Stormtroopers are dusty and dinged up.
I say some costumes should be very weathered if appropriate.
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moselder71 (Todd Barclay)



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PostPosted: Sat Nov 18, 2017 12:51 am    Post subject: endor weathering Reply with quote

I totally agree too many troopers r too clean. as a trooper you would be kneeling down, laying on your belly, your elbows from propping yourself up, your gloves would be filthy, the brim of your helmet from always touching it and putting it on. thats what a trooper does and looks like. I went back to my old uniforms when I was in the army and seen where they were dirty and worn.
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Ritin Kornas ()
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 18, 2017 10:54 am    Post subject: Re: endor weathering Reply with quote

moselder71 wrote:
I totally agree too many troopers r too clean. as a trooper you would be kneeling down, laying on your belly, your elbows from propping yourself up, your gloves would be filthy, the brim of your helmet from always touching it and putting it on. thats what a trooper does and looks like. I went back to my old uniforms when I was in the army and seen where they were dirty and worn.

I personally like some weathering, however, this is a personal taste and even if we favor one thing, we should not require it form everyone else. I perfectly understand people who want to keep it relatively clean. I't snot because they spend time in the wood that soldier can't be meticulous about cleaning. Then there is aging of the costume which a different type of weathering than getting it dirty. And for the aging it's also the same, matter of taste.
And your argument of they would touch the helmet everytime so it should be weathered... could be a new member of the alliance commando :p or brand new uniform hehehe
So even if I like quite some weathering, I'll never ask someone to do more than what he wants Smile except if it want to claim to be a specific character from the commandos Wink
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