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Jedi Tunic Tutorials (plus tabards/obi), by SithariRog
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JediKai (Kate B)
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2012 4:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One CAN wash wool but it must be pre-washed prior to making the article of clothing. After having done so, the clothing can be washed. I washed my 100% wool in cold water on gentle prior to making my robe so now I can wash my robe.

I do the same with linen and raw silk.

Even with fabrics that are washable, such as cotton, the fabric must be pre-washed before the garment is made.
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SithariRog (Roger Allen)
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2012 12:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep, Kate Very Happy

Unfortunately, I didn't learn that until AFTER I made my robe...which is why I now stress RESEARCH! lol

I would add this however...

Be aware of how wide your fabric needs to be. For example...if your fabric is 60" wide and you're over 6' tall AND you're making a Jedi robe without a seam at the shoulder, then the measurement from the neck to the arm (including enough to hem) might be as much as 52"-55". If your fabric shrinks as much as 10% (which is probably a normal range of shrinkage...but for some fabrics might be on the low side), you could be screwed.

I suggest folks wash (in what ever manner they're going to normally wash their costume) a test sample of the fabric and see how it will behave Wink
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Jedi_Chris ()
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PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2012 3:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roger, if the skirt is attatched to the waist seam, why does it look like you haven't cut along the waist in your finish patterns, but rather a few inches below the waist? Did you actually cut along the waist later or am I missing a step?

The waist does seem kind of high for the 'skirt' to start, but if the case is cut along the waist seam (with an added 5/8 for my seam allowance) then Im ready to cut my pattern!
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DX6channel ()



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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 3:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In your costume, you have a much bigger V in the collar of the outer tunic. I like it much more closed (like in this picture http://www.padawansguide.com/obiwan/three/promo5_m.jpg). Is that how the pattern is made, or is it just how you were wearing it?
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SithariRog (Roger Allen)
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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jedi_Chris wrote:
Roger, if the skirt is attatched to the waist seam, why does it look like you haven't cut along the waist in your finish patterns, but rather a few inches below the waist? Did you actually cut along the waist later or am I missing a step?

The waist does seem kind of high for the 'skirt' to start, but if the case is cut along the waist seam (with an added 5/8 for my seam allowance) then Im ready to cut my pattern!


Sorry, Jedi_Chris, I could have sworn I replyed to your question.

I'm not wholly understanding your question, but I'll tell you what I did, which should help.

The Outer Tunic is made in (for all intents and purposes) two pieces, the part above the waist and the skirt (the part below the waist). Getting detailed...the right front skirt was sewed to the right front OT panel, the left front skirt was sewed to the left front OT panel and the back skirt was sewed to the back OT panel. Then...each section was sewed together as pictured.

This way, the seam where the skirt is attached is hidden by the obi.

I will also tell you that the center of the obi and leather belt is worn a bit higher than where one traditionally wears belts, so this OT-to-skirt seam is also a bit higher...on me, it's right around my belly button.

Hope that helps.

DX6channel wrote:
In your costume, you have a much bigger V in the collar of the outer tunic. I like it much more closed (like in this picture http://www.padawansguide.com/obiwan/three/promo5_m.jpg). Is that how the pattern is made, or is it just how you were wearing it?


That's just the way I'm wearing it. I spent a great deal of time to get the inner tunic for my "OWK" costume that I wanted to make sure the inner tunic collar was visible. I could, very easily close the outer tunic more tightly around my body, thus making the "V" much smaller Wink

This is why I LOVE wearing the Jedi costume....it's loose fitting and VERY comfortable!
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DX6channel ()



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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 6:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks!
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Zam I Am ()
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 1:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just starting on my inner and outer tunic, and my character uses pretty much the same design, ruffled inner sleeves tunic. The question is the v of your inner tunic with OWK - is that different from what you laid out in your patterning? In the first picture it looked like there were 2 other pleats near the v. That's not what's in your pattern, right?
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SithariRog (Roger Allen)
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2012 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zam I Am wrote:
Just starting on my inner and outer tunic, and my character uses pretty much the same design, ruffled inner sleeves tunic. The question is the v of your inner tunic with OWK - is that different from what you laid out in your patterning? In the first picture it looked like there were 2 other pleats near the v. That's not what's in your pattern, right?


That is correct. The pattern is, essentially the same. The only difference being is that I did a "double fold" or a three "pleat" collar that was attached to the inner tunic, rather than the plain collar that is used for the outer tunic. The inner tunic collar pleats or folds were done and the collar was simply attached, in the same manner as the outer tunic (the right outer sides were sewn together, the inner side was slip stitched to hide the stitch. Hope that made sense.
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DX6channel ()



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2012 5:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Right now I'm making the pattern for the tabards. In the picture you have three blue lines for the widening of the shoulder; are they in the middle?
Max
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Mihunai (Jermain Palmen)
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2012 6:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Speaking of which, why -did- you widen the shoulders?
Was this a personal choice, or did the 'movie' tabards have this too?

I'm asking because I couldn't find any definitive reference myself...
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SithariRog (Roger Allen)
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2012 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DX6channel wrote:
Right now I'm making the pattern for the tabards. In the picture you have three blue lines for the widening of the shoulder; are they in the middle?
Max

Mihunai wrote:
Speaking of which, why -did- you widen the shoulders?
Was this a personal choice, or did the 'movie' tabards have this too?

I'm asking because I couldn't find any definitive reference myself...


To answer both of your questions in one fell swoop...

The blue lines represent that portion of the tabards (at the shoulder) that encompasses the whole of the shoulder from front arm pit to back arm pit. In other words, the "front" blue line falls about where the front of the arm pit is and the "back" blue line falls where the arm pit is on the back. The center blue line falls at the crest of the shoulder. The front and back lines would be a little different on everyone, if you choose to make this modification to your tabards.

In my mock ups (before making the real thing) I made tabards "straight" with no widening at the shoulder. The tabards at the shoulder looked "skinny" and didn't look at all like they did in the movie for Mr. McGregor. So, I decided to widen the tabards at the shoulder to give this effect. When wearing the costume, even without the robe, you can't tell that this shoulder part of my tabards are wider...because the costume fits my body.

I will say that it took a couple of trial-and-error sessions to get the shape of the tabards right for my body. I did this with either old sheets or scrap material. There's a technique for developing patterns by draping fabric across a body double/mannequin. You drape, pin, cut the fabric to hang the way you want it, then use that as your pattern piece...if that made sense.

I, personally, feel it is good for every costumer to evaluate their costume for fit and to adjust the costume appropriately. It's more important for a costume to fit your body, than to stick too rigidly to a set of costume standards or to a given reference for how a costume was made in a movie. Keep in mind that all entertainment costumes might follow a pattern for the theatrical seamstress to know how to make it, but they make individual modifications to a given costume to fit the actor. You'll NEVER find a pattern or reference for, say...an ObiWan Kenobi...costume that is going to look right on every costumer. It needs to be modified. This is why, when someone asks me for measurements for a given costume piece...they don't get just the measurement, they get the "why" behind the measurement so that they can adapt their costume to their body and make it look beyond incredible.

As an example, I made a Jedi costume for a friend who is a fair bit larger than me, both in height and girth. Because of his width, his tabards needed to be wider to look right. Because his shoulders were not porportionally "wide", his tabards ended up being more straight.

I hope this helps Very Happy
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Mihunai (Jermain Palmen)
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2012 1:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That answers it for me Wink

It's always interesting to hear other people's
'costume philosphies', especially when it's based
on personal experience and reference.
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Tag Aldeggon ()
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2012 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's ultimately the key to making a superior Jedi costume - perfect fit. Just as getting a perfect suit requires meticulous tailoring specified to the wearer, so too does the Jedi tunic need careful consideration of build, height, and proportion.

For example I have a pretty fit, healthy build with good shoulder width and average height at 5'9. However, I have unusually long, slim arms, and shorter legs. Yes, like a monkey. So, my tabbards are perfectly straight since I narrow at the waist anyway, but the tunic is longer and the obi is high; this makes the legs seem longer in proportion to my long ape-arms, and the outfit has a perfect, tailored look. I also used a rich, fine-weave corduroy for the fabric to add some structured shape to my slimmer frame.

Now, if I had a different build, or was taller, or heavier, all of those details would need to change. The kind of details you see on shows like "What Not to Wear" apply to Jedi costumes as well. My father does professional costuming, and the most important part of a costume is FIT. Until the ensemble is perfectly fitted to flatter your frame, it will look like a costume. Once it fits, it becomes real.

Sorry for the long post, but I hope this helps some people in the end!
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Ky-Wan Zann ()
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2012 1:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agrred, these outfits are not simply off the rack. I have broad shoulders and a defined chest and I have a real hard time getting komono type attire to hug my neck as it should.......with custom made stuff that is greatly reduced in most cases if the seamstress is skilled.
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Zam I Am ()
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 4:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ugh, I am making the tabard pattern now, but with mine, there is no seam at the shoulder in the real costume, so I am making my own. I also have to adjust for female proportions of course... Any female jedi or suggestions for this future female jedi to where I should widen or narrowed tabbards in certain parts to adjust for contour? I am scared to cut into my pleather. I used one muslin test, but it's not sewn yet, cause I forgot to account for the shoulder and my girth, so back to the adjusting the muslin test. I blew up a picture of Bultar and just used a muslin over it and traced it. But I don't know how to account for the 3D effect.
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