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Folcrum Ahsoka Pepakura Lekku Tutorial

 
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SwoozyC (Danielle Clay)
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Joined: 02 Aug 2017
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2019 8:29 pm    Post subject: Folcrum Ahsoka Pepakura Lekku Tutorial Reply with quote

I really loved making my headpiece this way. I had made two previous attempts using other techniques, and for me, this turned out to be the best by far. It’s very light weight and easy to wear. I can wear it for an entire con day and be pretty comfortable the entire time. It’s also modeled directly off of a 3D image of Ahsoka, so it turns out to be very accurate. As with most Fulcrum lekku, it is very difficult to move your head side to side due to the headpiece being built out of foam.


Materials:
I used 2 mm craft foam for the entire headpiece and it definitely holds up well. I don’t think you need anything thicker.
I hot glued all the pieces together. This Fulcrum build was my first ever cosplay so I was not aware of the magic that is contact cement. If I had it to do over again, I would probably try using the contact cement and then caulking the seams for a smoother look.
Liquid latex to cover the headpiece and give it that skin-like texture
Acrylic paints in white and gray-tinted navy blue. I used Folk Art’s Wicker White and Navy Blue (with a touch of the white mixed in)


On With The Tutorial…
First of all, you need Windows or a Windows simulator to run Pepakura. You will need access to Pepakura during the entire build process up until all of the pieces are glued together.

You can access the Pepakura file here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/12x0GRv2Yipyx66JmwfgFNy4O6n1Ez1Ac/view?usp=sharing.
Open the file in Pepakura and the first thing you are going to want to do is size the Ahsoka image. Click on the circled button (see image 1 below) and a window will pop up with height, width, and depth sizes.


Image 1

We are only really interested in the height - you are going to want to change the height, in inches, to match your size. Keep in mind that the total height is your height plus the height of the montals. I am 67 inches, and I added 9 inches of montral height to total 76 inches. Add an amount that is proportional to you. If you are only 5’1”, say, 9 inches of montrals might look to big on you.

Once you have the correct height in, you can print out your pattern. On the right side of the screen you can see the preview image (image 2 below). It also shows how many sheets of paper the pattern will print out on.


Image 2

After its been printed, number every page and write that page number on every piece of pattern on that page. This will make it much easier to know which piece you are dealing with later. Cut the pattern out and tape together all the pieces that make up a larger pattern piece. Transfer the pattern onto your craft foam. I used one large sheet. The pattern took up a little more than half the sheet, so you’ll have plenty left over for other projects. Make sure you are very diligent about transferring the pattern accurately. Put hash marks at all the places where the lines inside the pattern meat the out edge of the pattern - this will help you line pieces up properly. Again, transfer all the page numbers onto the foam to keep track of which piece you are working with.


Image 3

Now you are ready to glue! This is where you will rely heavily on Pepakura, so open that up, and click on the button that is circled on the photo below (image 4).


Image 4

Now you can use your mouse to hover over any piece’s edge to see the edge that should be glued to it (image 5). This is why you will need Pepakura open and available for so much of this project.


Image 5

If you hover over an edge and the line goes off to no where, that edge is not glued to anything else (image 6).


Image 6

As I mentioned before, I think this project would look better at the end if you use contact cement, but if you do decide to use a hot glue gun, I have some tips that I picked up along the way. At first, I tried to very diligently apply a thin layer of glue to one edge and then attach the other edge. It ended up being pretty in consistent and uneven due to the thinness of the foam and probably my glue gunning skills. I ended up developing a technique I call “welding”, in which I laid the two edges that I was gluing together face down in my table and lined them up. I think put a thick layer of glue on the seam and held the pieces in place as the glue dried (image 7).


Image 7

I glued 1-2 inches at a time, making my way down until the entire seam of those two pieces was covered. Reminder: this glue on the “wrong” side of the foam. At this point, there is no glue on the side of the foam that is visible on the completed headpiece.

Once the glue completely dried, I flipped it over to the right side was facing me. I put a very thin line of glue along the seam, again working in small sections. I then used the flat part of the metal tip of my glue gun to flatten out the glue until it was flush with the foam. This both secures and hides the seam. The parts of my headpiece where I used this technique look much better than the parts where I was just trying to glue the two edges together.

The tips of the lekku and montrals are really weird. I honestly don;t know how this is *supposed* to be done. You’ll have several weirdly shaped ends of pieces to glue together. I just ended up piling them on top of each other, gluing each end piece to the one below it, and then making a smooth mound out of several layers of hot glue. If you dip your finger in water first, you can shape the glue while it’s still hot to get a smoothly rounded tip.

After your headpiece is fully glued together it’ll look like this (image Cool:

[img]https://i.imgur.com/OrBJUok.jpg?1[/img]
Image 8

This actually has a layer of latex on them. Which brings us to our next step: Cover the entire headpiece in several layers of liquid latex. I did 5 layers. The headpiece will feel much sturdier and have a nice, skin-like texture. Make sure you let the latex fully dry between layers and always use a clean brush. Little chunks of latex will break off and ruin the texture of your headpiece if you do not do these. I learned the hard way!

After You latex layers are one, it’s time to paint your headpiece. I like to add a little liquid latex to my acrylic paints to make them more flexible when they dry. This helps prevent cracking and chipping. The latex does darken the dried paint color, so paint a test swatch first to make sure you are getting the final color you like. Once it’s painted most mistakes and seams are not noticeable. I made quite a few mistakes along the way and still love my headpiece.

At this point I glued the foam crown that I made onto the headpiece. Then there way the trick of getting the headpiece to stay in place. I tried spirit gumming it to my head, but there were not enough places where the foam came into contact with my skin. What I ended up doing instead was gluing elastic to the head piece to hold it tight to my head. The elastic is glued to the portion of the headpiece that sits right in front of my right ear, wraps around the base of my head and is glued to the portion of the headpiece that right in from of my left ear. This pulls the headpiece tightly onto my face. I also use double sided tape on my forehead right at my hairline (not in my hair) to attack the headpiece to the top of my head, and it DOES NOT MOVE.



Please feel free to ask me any questions!

**edited to include link to file


Last edited by SwoozyC (Danielle Clay) on Mon Oct 07, 2019 7:01 pm; edited 1 time in total
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io-wren ()
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Joined: 16 Apr 2019
Posts: 1
Location: Cali, Colombia
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2019 6:35 pm    Post subject: Pepakura file Reply with quote

Hello!
First of all let me say that your Ahsoka headpiece turned out fantastic! I’ve been trying to figure out how to make it forever and had not come across a tutorial as handy as this one. However it says on there that the pepakura file can be accessed “here”, yet there’s no link or anything available :/
Is there anyway you could put the link up so I can access the file? It would be of super huge help!

Thank you!
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SwoozyC (Danielle Clay)
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Joined: 02 Aug 2017
Posts: 15

Medals: None

PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2019 7:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Pepakura file Reply with quote

io-wren wrote:
Hello!
First of all let me say that your Ahsoka headpiece turned out fantastic! I’ve been trying to figure out how to make it forever and had not come across a tutorial as handy as this one. However it says on there that the pepakura file can be accessed “here”, yet there’s no link or anything available :/
Is there anyway you could put the link up so I can access the file? It would be of super huge help!

Thank you!


I thought i made that link, I'm sorry! Here is where you can get the file:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/12x0GRv2Yipyx66JmwfgFNy4O6n1Ez1Ac/view?usp=sharing

I'm so glad you found this tutorial helpful!
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